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Businessmen, Partisans and Oligarchs: Political Control, News Production Philosophies And Partisan Bias In Mexican Television News
Unformatted Document Text:  32 The rest of the stations when to Ricardo Salinas Pliego, a Monterrey businessman and business partner of President Carlos Salinas’ brother, Raul.. They became the country’s second- largest network, TV Azteca. Cabada Alvídez said the company’s vision of political news as one of public service. “We look for the common good, the best that we can offer our people so that this city advances on all of the issues important to this very distinct community,” he said. 37 Televisa del Bajio In contrast, the Mexico City-based managers of national network Televisa viewed local news stations primarily as a place to repeat nationally sold advertising. By 2000, however, the network viewed the stations as self-sufficient moneymaking enterprises. The new management philosophy under young Emilio Azcárraga Jean since 1997 committed the network and its wholly owned affiliates to a commercialized approach to the news that has certain limitations for democratic development, such as a tendency to emphasize conflict, individuals over systems, and crime. However, it does give voters information about politically diverse candidates for office. 38 Televisa’s commercial production model, which is essentially market driven and similar to production models in the United States, responds to audience preferences and particularly ratings. A distinctive trait of the model, however, is to sell news-like interviews as advertising. Called “capsules,” they can run for two minutes inside a newscast and transmit events that the regular news does not cover, such as a campaign rally. 39 37 Cabada Alvídez. 38 Daniel C. Hallin, “La Nota Roja: Popular Journalism and the Transition to Democracy in Mexico,” in Tabloid Tales. Global Debates over Media Pratices (Lanahan, Maryland: 2000). Hughes, Culture Clash in the Newsroom. 39 Leonel Nogueda Solís, interview, Léon, Guanajuato, 2 June 2002).

Authors: Hughes, Sallie. and Lawson, Chappell.
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32
The rest of the stations when to Ricardo Salinas Pliego, a Monterrey businessman and
business partner of President Carlos Salinas’ brother, Raul.. They became the country’s second-
largest network, TV Azteca.
Cabada Alvídez said the company’s vision of political news as one of public service.
“We look for the common good, the best that we can offer our people so that this city advances
on all of the issues important to this very distinct community,” he said.
37
Televisa del Bajio
In contrast, the Mexico City-based managers of national network Televisa viewed local
news stations primarily as a place to repeat nationally sold advertising. By 2000, however, the
network viewed the stations as self-sufficient moneymaking enterprises. The new management
philosophy under young Emilio Azcárraga Jean since 1997 committed the network and its
wholly owned affiliates to a commercialized approach to the news that has certain limitations for
democratic development, such as a tendency to emphasize conflict, individuals over systems, and
crime. However, it does give voters information about politically diverse candidates for office.
38
Televisa’s commercial production model, which is essentially market driven and similar
to production models in the United States, responds to audience preferences and particularly
ratings. A distinctive trait of the model, however, is to sell news-like interviews as advertising.
Called “capsules,” they can run for two minutes inside a newscast and transmit events that the
regular news does not cover, such as a campaign rally.
39
37
Cabada Alvídez.
38
Daniel C. Hallin, “La Nota Roja: Popular Journalism and the Transition to Democracy in Mexico,” in Tabloid
Tales. Global Debates over Media Pratices (Lanahan, Maryland: 2000). Hughes, Culture Clash in the Newsroom.
39
Leonel Nogueda Solís, interview, Léon, Guanajuato, 2 June 2002).


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