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Businessmen, Partisans and Oligarchs: Political Control, News Production Philosophies And Partisan Bias In Mexican Television News
Unformatted Document Text:  37 The public service model appears when the state owns news production facilities, but does not use the news for political purposes. Examples of this model such as the news programming of the British Broadcasting Corporation or the United States’ Public Broadcasting Service were not present in our sample in 2000. However, interviews indicated that the Guanajuato state television network was moving in that direction by 2002 after a new governor took office and appointed a new station manager. Likewise, journalists at the Tlaxcala state television station had this model in mind when they covered state elections in 2002 and were later fired for not sufficiently supporting the party in office. On the other hand, the propaganda model appears when the state owns news production facilities and the party in power uses the newsroom politically. All three state-owned newsrooms in our sample – Guanajuato, Tlaxcala and Tabasco – fit this model during the 2000 election. Among private sector television stations, two outcomes are possible. The first is a commercial model in which financial and political incentives drive news production. Commercial newsrooms may be more civic-oriented, balancing commercial imperatives with the goals of citizens’ right to public information and government accountability, or more market- driven, with profit alone driving news production. The Baja California station owned by Intermedia and Televisa del Bajío in Guanajuato fit this model. Intermedia tends toward the civic orientation and Televisa tends toward a market-driven model. The second outcome for private sector news stations is an oligarchic model in which the media owner -- as part of the local oligarchy -- uses the news in collusion with political power brokers for mutual gain. This occurs where newsrooms are used to further owners’ political or personal calculations. Tabasco’s Channel 9 is an example of this model.

Authors: Hughes, Sallie. and Lawson, Chappell.
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37
The public service model appears when the state owns news production facilities, but does
not use the news for political purposes. Examples of this model such as the news programming
of the British Broadcasting Corporation or the United States’ Public Broadcasting Service were
not present in our sample in 2000. However, interviews indicated that the Guanajuato state
television network was moving in that direction by 2002 after a new governor took office and
appointed a new station manager. Likewise, journalists at the Tlaxcala state television station had
this model in mind when they covered state elections in 2002 and were later fired for not
sufficiently supporting the party in office. On the other hand, the propaganda model appears
when the state owns news production facilities and the party in power uses the newsroom
politically. All three state-owned newsrooms in our sample – Guanajuato, Tlaxcala and Tabasco
– fit this model during the 2000 election.
Among private sector television stations, two outcomes are possible. The first is a
commercial model in which financial and political incentives drive news production.
Commercial newsrooms may be more civic-oriented, balancing commercial imperatives with the
goals of citizens’ right to public information and government accountability, or more market-
driven, with profit alone driving news production. The Baja California station owned by
Intermedia and Televisa del Bajío in Guanajuato fit this model. Intermedia tends toward the civic
orientation and Televisa tends toward a market-driven model. The second outcome for private
sector news stations is an oligarchic model in which the media owner -- as part of the local
oligarchy -- uses the news in collusion with political power brokers for mutual gain. This occurs
where newsrooms are used to further owners’ political or personal calculations. Tabasco’s
Channel 9 is an example of this model.


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