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From Midnight to Broad Daylight: The constructive capabilities of techno and
Unformatted Document Text:  From Midnight to Broad Daylight 11 choice, ecstasy (1998, p. 85). On the other hand, he classified techno with ambient and electronica, stating that these subgenres "strip rave of its, well, raveyness, to fit a white studenty sensibility." He goes on to suggest that it is a boys’ world with a contempt for pop and "ill- defined conviction that something radical is at stake in this music" (1998, p. 85). As will be discussed further on, it is precisely this stereotyping of techno that Detroit Techno producers and the Detroit Electronic Music Festival (DEMF) is currently struggling against. While it can be argued that the situation is changing, rave culture of the late 1980s in Britain and early 1990s in the U.S. had much in common with medieval carnival times. As Bakhtin puts it, carnival is not a spectacle seen by the people; they live in it, and everyone participates because its very idea embraces all the people. While carnival lasts, there is no other life outside it. During carnival time life is subject only to its laws, that is, the laws of its own freedom. It has a universal spirit; it is a special condition of the entire world, of the world's revival and renewal, in which all take part (1984, p. 7, italics added). Referring back to Pratt's idea of "free space" and music as a community-building medium, it can be said that in their early days raves seemed to be the ideal chronotopic, community constructing space for youth. At odd hours of the night in unidentifiable spaces such as warehouses, while the rest of the world sleeps, "ravers" literally dance the night away. As was stated in the beginning of this essay, in the U.S. Frankie Bones originally proliferated ideals of community in the rave scene with his coining of the acronym P.L.U.R. Raves became an opportunity and a place where this specific class of youth could take control of an environment, if only for a night. Organizing, performing at, or attending raves was no longer relegated to individuals living in or near major cities. Events took place anywhere from barns in the country to warehouses in the city and were often fully conceived and managed by youth. Operating from a D.I.Y. (do it yourself) perspective, the production proved to be a process in which young people were fully in control of

Authors: Farrugia, Rebekah.
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From Midnight to Broad Daylight
11
choice, ecstasy (1998, p. 85). On the other hand, he classified techno with ambient and
electronica, stating that these subgenres "strip rave of its, well, raveyness, to fit a white studenty
sensibility." He goes on to suggest that it is a boys’ world with a contempt for pop and "ill-
defined conviction that something radical is at stake in this music" (1998, p. 85). As will be
discussed further on, it is precisely this stereotyping of techno that Detroit Techno producers and
the Detroit Electronic Music Festival (DEMF) is currently struggling against.
While it can be argued that the situation is changing, rave culture of the late 1980s in
Britain and early 1990s in the U.S. had much in common with medieval carnival times. As
Bakhtin puts it,
carnival is not a spectacle seen by the people; they live in it, and everyone participates
because its very idea embraces all the people. While carnival lasts, there is no other life
outside it. During carnival time life is subject only to its laws, that is, the laws of its own
freedom. It has a universal spirit; it is a special condition of the entire world, of the
world's revival and renewal, in which all take part (1984, p. 7, italics added).
Referring back to Pratt's idea of "free space" and music as a community-building medium, it can
be said that in their early days raves seemed to be the ideal chronotopic, community constructing
space for youth. At odd hours of the night in unidentifiable spaces such as warehouses, while the
rest of the world sleeps, "ravers" literally dance the night away. As was stated in the beginning
of this essay, in the U.S. Frankie Bones originally proliferated ideals of community in the rave
scene with his coining of the acronym P.L.U.R. Raves became an opportunity and a place where
this specific class of youth could take control of an environment, if only for a night. Organizing,
performing at, or attending raves was no longer relegated to individuals living in or near major
cities. Events took place anywhere from barns in the country to warehouses in the city and were
often fully conceived and managed by youth. Operating from a D.I.Y. (do it yourself)
perspective, the production proved to be a process in which young people were fully in control of


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