All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

From Midnight to Broad Daylight: The constructive capabilities of techno and
Unformatted Document Text:  From Midnight to Broad Daylight 12 creating a space promoting specific values and concerns. However, with respect to the politics of rave culture in Britain Martin argues that "raves attract a wide variety of people, transcending class, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation differences" (1999, p. 78). While this might have been the original desire of rave culture, by the mid 1990s in the U.S., rave became a predominantly white scene, and in metropolitan areas it was overwhelmingly dominated by suburban youth. Sherlock argues that dance is a primary force that reflects a worldview. She states that all dance is "coded with an aesthetic according to the cultural values of the group promoting it" (1996, p. 526). Speaking about modern dance specifically she goes on to say that "the aesthetic of the dance is firmly located within a stratum of society and created by socially produced embodied individuals enabled and constrained by dance traditions, training, and audiences" (p. 526). The particular constraints of tradition and audiences are restrictions that rave culture works to overcome through investing time in developing its own rituals and traditions that have much in common with Bakhtin’s carnival. Dance in particular, is used as a community building mechanism in rave culture more so than in most environments in which it is present such as clubs or professional performances. Bakhtin tells us that carnival "does not acknowledge any distinction between actors and spectators. Footlights would destroy a carnival, as the absence of footlights would destroy a theatrical performance" (Bakhtin, 1984, p. 7). For instance, with the rise of EDM DJs took on new roles. They "incorporate[d] degrees of human touch, intervention and improvisation. They play[ed] a key role in the enculturation of records for dancing…always as a representative and respondent to the crowd" (Thornton, 1996, p. 60). However, unlike in Britain where "in purpose-built clubs, mixing booths tend to be tucked away and DJs unseen" (Thornton, 1996, p. 65), in the height of the underground dance communities in the U.S. DJ and

Authors: Farrugia, Rebekah.
first   previous   Page 12 of 27   next   last



background image
From Midnight to Broad Daylight
12
creating a space promoting specific values and concerns. However, with respect to the politics
of rave culture in Britain Martin argues that "raves attract a wide variety of people, transcending
class, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation differences" (1999, p. 78). While this might have
been the original desire of rave culture, by the mid 1990s in the U.S., rave became a
predominantly white scene, and in metropolitan areas it was overwhelmingly dominated by
suburban youth.
Sherlock argues that dance is a primary force that reflects a worldview. She states that all
dance is "coded with an aesthetic according to the cultural values of the group promoting it"
(1996, p. 526). Speaking about modern dance specifically she goes on to say that "the aesthetic
of the dance is firmly located within a stratum of society and created by socially produced
embodied individuals enabled and constrained by dance traditions, training, and audiences" (p.
526). The particular constraints of tradition and audiences are restrictions that rave culture
works to overcome through investing time in developing its own rituals and traditions that have
much in common with Bakhtin’s carnival. Dance in particular, is used as a community building
mechanism in rave culture more so than in most environments in which it is present such as
clubs or professional performances. Bakhtin tells us that carnival "does not acknowledge any
distinction between actors and spectators. Footlights would destroy a carnival, as the absence of
footlights would destroy a theatrical performance" (Bakhtin, 1984, p. 7). For instance, with the
rise of EDM DJs took on new roles. They "incorporate[d] degrees of human touch, intervention
and improvisation. They play[ed] a key role in the enculturation of records for dancing…always
as a representative and respondent to the crowd" (Thornton, 1996, p. 60). However, unlike in
Britain where "in purpose-built clubs, mixing booths tend to be tucked away and DJs unseen"
(Thornton, 1996, p. 65), in the height of the underground dance communities in the U.S. DJ and


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 12 of 27   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.