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From Midnight to Broad Daylight: The constructive capabilities of techno and
Unformatted Document Text:  From Midnight to Broad Daylight 15 parties, seeing the benefits they had in keeping kids off the streets (Silcott, 1999, p. 83), a philosophy that was completely contrary to that in Britain where officials created laws to ban the events. However, as the scope of raves and the number of attendees rose, the proliferation of drug use also escalated. In the early days, the Toronto police force’s main concern was that they "wanted the events safe and that they would rather have two thousand young people in a safe, controlled environment…than running loose on the streets" (Silcott, 1999, p. 84). However, as the years went by this sentiment began to change. Goldberg argues that it was the press that turned ravers into outlaws. She makes this argument in respect to both the US and Britain. However, from its inception the press in Britain attacked raving more directly and persistently than in the U.S. Unlike the chaotic mayhem that raves were consistently depicted as in British tabloids in the late 1980s, it was not until the late 1990s that panic stricken authority figures and the popular press in the U.S. began to voice concern and public outcry over rave culture and EDM. As was mentioned earlier on, in Britain this situation culminated with the passing of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act. The new law gave police more power and rights to shutdown gatherings with music (Goldberg 2000). Raphael (1999) claims that in general the positive cultural aspects of raves are virtually ignored by the mainstream Toronto press. Usual newspaper coverage of raves stems from headlines such as "A deathwatch on raves" from The Globe and Mail and "Young clubbers ecstatic about rave chemicals" in The Toronto Sun (online). Far from being unique to Toronto, negative depictions of rave culture in popular media are typical. The majority of the mainstream press coverage on rave culture has concerned itself with narratives of drug related incidents, paying no attention to the aspect from which all else stems, the music.

Authors: Farrugia, Rebekah.
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From Midnight to Broad Daylight
15
parties, seeing the benefits they had in keeping kids off the streets (Silcott, 1999, p. 83), a
philosophy that was completely contrary to that in Britain where officials created laws to ban the
events. However, as the scope of raves and the number of attendees rose, the proliferation of
drug use also escalated. In the early days, the Toronto police force’s main concern was that they
"wanted the events safe and that they would rather have two thousand young people in a safe,
controlled environment…than running loose on the streets" (Silcott, 1999, p. 84). However, as
the years went by this sentiment began to change. Goldberg argues that it was the press that
turned ravers into outlaws. She makes this argument in respect to both the US and Britain.
However, from its inception the press in Britain attacked raving more directly and persistently
than in the U.S. Unlike the chaotic mayhem that raves were consistently depicted as in British
tabloids in the late 1980s, it was not until the late 1990s that panic stricken authority figures and
the popular press in the U.S. began to voice concern and public outcry over rave culture and
EDM. As was mentioned earlier on, in Britain this situation culminated with the passing of the
Criminal Justice and Public Order Act. The new law gave police more power and rights to
shutdown gatherings with music (Goldberg 2000).
Raphael (1999) claims that in general the positive cultural aspects of raves are virtually
ignored by the mainstream Toronto press. Usual newspaper coverage of raves stems from
headlines such as "A deathwatch on raves" from The Globe and Mail and "Young clubbers
ecstatic about rave chemicals" in The Toronto Sun (online). Far from being unique to Toronto,
negative depictions of rave culture in popular media are typical. The majority of the mainstream
press coverage on rave culture has concerned itself with narratives of drug related incidents,
paying no attention to the aspect from which all else stems, the music.


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