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From Midnight to Broad Daylight: The constructive capabilities of techno and
Unformatted Document Text:  From Midnight to Broad Daylight 18 their racial fantasies blossoming wildly, and even when race and poverty didn’t' bar them from the mainstream, their alienation sealed the door shut" (1998, p. 353). A discussion of the history of Detroit would not be complete without reference to the auto industry's significant contribution to the city's economic history. The 1920s is considered the decade of the auto industry. From then on Detroit became the "motor city." Money poured into the city and was used to build "eye-catching Gothic and Art Deco skyscrapers" along its downtown (Jacoby, 1998, p. 233). Nevertheless, the city was always known as a "rough-and- tumble factory town." But Jacoby tells us that what made the city's black community distinct was the same force that its white culture: "the many-tentacled and all-powerful automobile industry." Generous auto wages created a solid black working class, as Henry Ford was one of the country's first northern industrialists to hire blacks "in significant numbers," but as the city's population expanded, so did its ghetto. Tensions grew worse as more and more black migrated to the city, and "before long, Detroit had earned a national reputation as a place of unusually bitter racial hatred" (Jacoby, 1999, p. 234). As factories became obsolete, they were abandoned, and new ones were built further out from downtown. In the forties, development moved to the suburbs. Workers moved with them, leaving the poor and powerless – both black and white – behind. "The result was a vast, sprawling city: always vita and developing at the edges, but increasingly impoverished and physically rotten at the core" (Jacoby, 1999, p. 237). Over time, the "Big Three" workforce in Detroit would continue to decline, with jobs moving elsewhere in the nation and overseas. The powerful notion of Detroit as "rotten at the core" would come to dominant popular national discourse about the city. Herron sums up the impact of the economic and social conditions of the city as follows: “Detroit – more than any other spot in this country – has been so thoroughly

Authors: Farrugia, Rebekah.
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From Midnight to Broad Daylight
18
their racial fantasies blossoming wildly, and even when race and poverty didn’t' bar them from
the mainstream, their alienation sealed the door shut" (1998, p. 353).
A discussion of the history of Detroit would not be complete without reference to the
auto industry's significant contribution to the city's economic history. The 1920s is considered
the decade of the auto industry. From then on Detroit became the "motor city." Money poured
into the city and was used to build "eye-catching Gothic and Art Deco skyscrapers" along its
downtown (Jacoby, 1998, p. 233). Nevertheless, the city was always known as a "rough-and-
tumble factory town." But Jacoby tells us that what made the city's black community distinct
was the same force that its white culture: "the many-tentacled and all-powerful automobile
industry." Generous auto wages created a solid black working class, as Henry Ford was one of
the country's first northern industrialists to hire blacks "in significant numbers," but as the city's
population expanded, so did its ghetto. Tensions grew worse as more and more black migrated
to the city, and "before long, Detroit had earned a national reputation as a place of unusually
bitter racial hatred" (Jacoby, 1999, p. 234).
As factories became obsolete, they were abandoned, and new ones were built further out
from downtown. In the forties, development moved to the suburbs. Workers moved with them,
leaving the poor and powerless – both black and white – behind. "The result was a vast,
sprawling city: always vita and developing at the edges, but increasingly impoverished and
physically rotten at the core" (Jacoby, 1999, p. 237). Over time, the "Big Three" workforce in
Detroit would continue to decline, with jobs moving elsewhere in the nation and overseas. The
powerful notion of Detroit as "rotten at the core" would come to dominant popular national
discourse about the city. Herron sums up the impact of the economic and social conditions of the
city as follows: “Detroit – more than any other spot in this country – has been so thoroughly


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