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From Midnight to Broad Daylight: The constructive capabilities of techno and
Unformatted Document Text:  From Midnight to Broad Daylight 19 humiliated by history, so emptied of the content, both material and human, that used to make this place mean, that it becomes questionable whether the city still exists at all in any practical sense" (Herron, 1993, p. 14). Techno in Detroit, in part responded to these notions of emptiness. Less soulful than the house music of Chicago, Detroit Techno is imbued with industrial sounds of machines and computers. Instead of reminiscing about the past, and finding little in the present, new artists were arguably obsessed with looking towards the future, as artists produced under the pseudonames "Cybotron" and "Time-Space Continuum," for labels such as "Planet E," and "Transmat," the latter being a term taken directly from Toffler’s The Third Wave. As I stated earlier, EDM and the rave scene evolved and thrived differently from one city to the next, even within the U.S. Infamously known as the birthplace of "techno" the unfolding of events in Detroit are unlike those of any other city. In 1991, after returning from an extended and successful stay in the U.K., early Detroit producers felt that "techno had been mutated, co- opted, and just plain misunderstood. The rave movement’s economies of scale had drastically altered the genre, sapping its music of complexity, intimacy, and soul...the Detroit sound as a whole went back ’underground.’" Most of these early Detroit Techno producers were black men who came back to the U.S. to find their music appropriated by a predominantly white rave scene. Detroit Techno artists such as Derrick May were discouraged by the fact that it was predominantly white youth who responded to their music. The term ’underground’ became a statement of purpose that meant total retrenchment and put the focus back on Detroit and the fundamentals of its music (Sicko, 1999, p. 139). While these artists would eventually connect with the American rave scene in 1993-1994 (Sicko, 1999, p. 122), their primary effort still remained focused on promoting an "underground" movement concerned with the music itself.

Authors: Farrugia, Rebekah.
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From Midnight to Broad Daylight
19
humiliated by history, so emptied of the content, both material and human, that used to make this
place mean, that it becomes questionable whether the city still exists at all in any practical sense"
(Herron, 1993, p. 14). Techno in Detroit, in part responded to these notions of emptiness. Less
soulful than the house music of Chicago, Detroit Techno is imbued with industrial sounds of
machines and computers. Instead of reminiscing about the past, and finding little in the present,
new artists were arguably obsessed with looking towards the future, as artists produced under the
pseudonames "Cybotron" and "Time-Space Continuum," for labels such as "Planet E," and
"Transmat," the latter being a term taken directly from Toffler’s The Third Wave.
As I stated earlier, EDM and the rave scene evolved and thrived differently from one city
to the next, even within the U.S. Infamously known as the birthplace of "techno" the unfolding
of events in Detroit are unlike those of any other city. In 1991, after returning from an extended
and successful stay in the U.K., early Detroit producers felt that "techno had been mutated, co-
opted, and just plain misunderstood. The rave movement’s economies of scale had drastically
altered the genre, sapping its music of complexity, intimacy, and soul...the Detroit sound as a
whole went back ’underground.’" Most of these early Detroit Techno producers were black men
who came back to the U.S. to find their music appropriated by a predominantly white rave scene.
Detroit Techno artists such as Derrick May were discouraged by the fact that it was
predominantly white youth who responded to their music. The term ’underground’ became a
statement of purpose that meant total retrenchment and put the focus back on Detroit and the
fundamentals of its music (Sicko, 1999, p. 139). While these artists would eventually connect
with the American rave scene in 1993-1994 (Sicko, 1999, p. 122), their primary effort still
remained focused on promoting an "underground" movement concerned with the music itself.


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