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From Midnight to Broad Daylight: The constructive capabilities of techno and
Unformatted Document Text:  From Midnight to Broad Daylight 8 A brief history of rave: culture and the carnivalesque In an article on popular music and community Pratt tells us that "music responds both to the increasingly common human experience of the decline of intimate connection to community…and also to the desires for new forms of community and new codes of public space." He goes on to say that "while popular music often provides commonly recognized affectively empowering experiences for its audiences, its effects may be more concretely described in terms of a particular kind of temporal-spatial creation", what he calls "free space" (Pratt, 1989, p. 59). As such, the underground techno scene is Detroit was conceived and materialized because of a strong desire for community. Similarly, the rave scene responded to a new longing for public space. Thus, while rave culture and EDM are not one in the same, they can both be interpreted as responses to a longing for community and space, a place to call one's own. Speaking about the late 1980s in Britain Sicko recounts how youth responded communally to the sounds of technology emerging at the time. “Free of the constraints of space and the law, parties grew into mass gatherings of thousands at a time and became known as ‘raves’” (1999, p. 114). Reynolds tells us that the turning point can in the summer of 1987 when Paul Oakenfold – a DJ and club promoter in London – rented a villa in Ibiza where he spent the summer dancing all night on ecstasy with DJ friends he invited (1999, p. 58). Upon their return to London they brought back with them "a complete subcultural package of slang, behavior, and clothing" (Reynolds, 1999, p. 58). Due to laws that restricted club operating hours, people wanting to dance all night began turning to illegal warehouse parties. According to Reynolds warehouse parties in London date back "to the reggae 'blues,' shebeens, and illegal after-hours

Authors: Farrugia, Rebekah.
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From Midnight to Broad Daylight
8
A brief history of rave: culture and the carnivalesque
In an article on popular music and community Pratt tells us that "music responds both to
the increasingly common human experience of the decline of intimate connection to
community…and also to the desires for new forms of community and new codes of public
space." He goes on to say that "while popular music often provides commonly recognized
affectively empowering experiences for its audiences, its effects may be more concretely
described in terms of a particular kind of temporal-spatial creation", what he calls "free space"
(Pratt, 1989, p. 59). As such, the underground techno scene is Detroit was conceived and
materialized because of a strong desire for community. Similarly, the rave scene responded to a
new longing for public space. Thus, while rave culture and EDM are not one in the same, they
can both be interpreted as responses to a longing for community and space, a place to call one's
own.
Speaking about the late 1980s in Britain Sicko recounts how youth responded
communally to the sounds of technology emerging at the time. “Free of the constraints of space
and the law, parties grew into mass gatherings of thousands at a time and became known as
‘raves’” (1999, p. 114). Reynolds tells us that the turning point can in the summer of 1987 when
Paul Oakenfold – a DJ and club promoter in London – rented a villa in Ibiza where he spent the
summer dancing all night on ecstasy with DJ friends he invited (1999, p. 58). Upon their return
to London they brought back with them "a complete subcultural package of slang, behavior, and
clothing" (Reynolds, 1999, p. 58). Due to laws that restricted club operating hours, people
wanting to dance all night began turning to illegal warehouse parties. According to Reynolds
warehouse parties in London date back "to the reggae 'blues,' shebeens, and illegal after-hours


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