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Ethnographic Interviews on the Digital Divide
Unformatted Document Text:  Ethnographic Interviews 13 Tina: Everything is. Interviewer: And Internet access, it’s just one more thing that you have to have to participate in society today and it costs a heck of a lot of money [laughs]... Tina: Yeah, right. Interviewer: I’m just wondering if you’ve ever given any thought to that, or... Tina: You know, I guess if we weren’t being given a computer, I wouldn’t put out money, I wouldn’t put money out to get one, because it’s unimportant to me. Although Ron would, and so because it was important to Ron, then you know, I would go ahead and do it but I don’t feel the need for a computer, I’ve gone this long without one. On the flip side I think it would be a great opportunity to talk to Sienna’s Grandma in California more, to be more connected to my friend in New York who has got an e-mail address, and stuff like that, or, if Sienna’s doing homework, you know, blink, blink, blink, click on bird eating spiders, and what they are about, and do a report on it and because we have more...you know what I’m saying? So I think they’re beneficial, but I don’t feel like [I have to have one]. Potential recipients of governmental programs offering computers were, in Tina’s mind, people who complained that their lack of computers was “unfair” but were to blame for their own lack; they were “doing it to themselves.” Relying on the discourse of individualism, she stated that everyone should be responsible for purchasing his or her own computer. Echoing David Mueller, Chris Chandler, and others, Tina believed that people like her who did not purchase computers simply did not prioritize such purchases. Like these other parents, she argued that computers were getting less expensive all the time. Yet while David Mueller and others sounded scornful of those they believed were

Authors: Clark, Lynn., Demont-Heinrich, Christof. and Webber, Scott.
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Ethnographic Interviews 13
Tina: Everything is.
Interviewer: And Internet access, it’s just one more thing that you have to have to
participate in society today and it costs a heck of a lot of money [laughs]...
Tina: Yeah, right.
Interviewer: I’m just wondering if you’ve ever given any thought to that, or...
Tina: You know, I guess if we weren’t being given a computer, I wouldn’t put
out money, I wouldn’t put money out to get one, because it’s unimportant to me.
Although Ron would, and so because it was important to Ron, then you know, I
would go ahead and do it but I don’t feel the need for a computer, I’ve gone this
long without one. On the flip side I think it would be a great opportunity to talk to
Sienna’s Grandma in California more, to be more connected to my friend in New
York who has got an e-mail address, and stuff like that, or, if Sienna’s doing
homework, you know, blink, blink, blink, click on bird eating spiders, and what
they are about, and do a report on it and because we have more...you know what
I’m saying? So I think they’re beneficial, but I don’t feel like [I have to have one].
Potential recipients of governmental programs offering computers were, in Tina’s mind,
people who complained that their lack of computers was “unfair” but were to blame for
their own lack; they were “doing it to themselves.” Relying on the discourse of
individualism, she stated that everyone should be responsible for purchasing his or her
own computer. Echoing David Mueller, Chris Chandler, and others, Tina believed that
people like her who did not purchase computers simply did not prioritize such purchases.
Like these other parents, she argued that computers were getting less expensive all the
time. Yet while David Mueller and others sounded scornful of those they believed were


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