All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Ethnographic Interviews on the Digital Divide
Unformatted Document Text:  Ethnographic Interviews 17 somewhat contradictory response to a question about whether the digital divide is a problem and how it should or should not be addressed: So I think that there are some people that just choose not [to get a computer]. But then there are also people who cannot afford to, who don’t have the financial means for whatever reason. So I think I would disagree [that computers are a luxury item]. Because it’s like saying that there is no upper class and lower class. [That] there is no middle class or upper class. You know, there’s no poverty. That’s bullshit [laughs]. So, yeah, I think there is a divide there. And where exactly it’s specified, who knows. You know, I don’t think it’s just two categories. I think there are different reasons for that divide. Yeah, there are some people who choose not to and there are some people who don’t have a choice about it, or don’t appear to have a choice about it. Echoing the critiques of critical theorists, Anna Lally recognized the deeper societal divisions that shape and reinforce differences in computer use and knowledge. Similarly, Molly Wilcox reflected on computers and the digital divide with deep ambivalence. At 69, Molly worked part-time as a clerk at a local department store to help provide support for her single parent disabled daughter and her granddaughter. She had very limited experience with the family’s previously owned computer with slow access, but nevertheless believed in the importance and inevitability of computers, especially in relation to her granddaughter’s future prospects. While she, like Megan Sealy and Anna Lally, spoke of the importance of parental initiative in securing access to a computer and the skills deemed necessary, Molly spoke of the digital divide by flip-flopping between narrative strategies that embraced and eschewed the assumptions of individualism:

Authors: Clark, Lynn., Demont-Heinrich, Christof. and Webber, Scott.
first   previous   Page 17 of 28   next   last



background image
Ethnographic Interviews 17
somewhat contradictory response to a question about whether the digital divide is a
problem and how it should or should not be addressed:
So I think that there are some people that just choose not [to get a computer]. But
then there are also people who cannot afford to, who don’t have the financial
means for whatever reason. So I think I would disagree [that computers are a
luxury item]. Because it’s like saying that there is no upper class and lower class.
[That] there is no middle class or upper class. You know, there’s no poverty.
That’s bullshit [laughs]. So, yeah, I think there is a divide there. And where
exactly it’s specified, who knows. You know, I don’t think it’s just two categories.
I think there are different reasons for that divide. Yeah, there are some people
who choose not to and there are some people who don’t have a choice about it, or
don’t appear to have a choice about it.
Echoing the critiques of critical theorists, Anna Lally recognized the deeper
societal divisions that shape and reinforce differences in computer use and knowledge.
Similarly, Molly Wilcox reflected on computers and the digital divide with deep
ambivalence. At 69, Molly worked part-time as a clerk at a local department store to help
provide support for her single parent disabled daughter and her granddaughter. She had
very limited experience with the family’s previously owned computer with slow access,
but nevertheless believed in the importance and inevitability of computers, especially in
relation to her granddaughter’s future prospects. While she, like Megan Sealy and Anna
Lally, spoke of the importance of parental initiative in securing access to a computer and
the skills deemed necessary, Molly spoke of the digital divide by flip-flopping between
narrative strategies that embraced and eschewed the assumptions of individualism:


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 17 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.