All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Rationality and Context: Antidotes for Anthrax Anecdotes
Unformatted Document Text:  10 A total of 85 undergraduate students, 56 women and 29 men, enrolled in communication courses at a large, West Coast university participated in the experiment for extra credit. Participants’ ages ranged from 17 to 25 years old (M = 20.58, SD = 1.39). Procedure Participants completed two different questionnaires individually and anonymously in a room by themselves. The first questionnaire’s instructions informed participants than they would be reading and evaluating, depending upon their random condition assignment, either one or two news stories that recently appeared on a local television news broadcast. They were instructed to complete the booklet without looking back to the story or stories. Participants assigned to the Anthrax Story Only condition read an edited version of a Cable News Network story about Kathy Nguyen, a New York City hospital worker who died from inhalation anthrax. The story summarized the events leading up to her death and observed that no traces of anthrax spores had been found in her apartment or work area. The story concluded Ms. Nguyen may have contracted her anthrax infection from a source other than contaminated mail. Before reading the anthrax story, individuals assigned to the Anthrax Story + Traffic Deaths Story condition read a news report about projected traffic deaths in the United States during the fourth quarter of 2001. The story included National Safety Council statistics indicating that between 1 October and 31 December 2001, approximately 10,000 Americans would die in traffic accidents. The report observed that over 40,000 Americans die in traffic accidents yearly. After reading the story or stories, participants completed a series of scales. They first indicated on a series of 11-point bi-polar scales how the anthrax story made them feel. They then indicated the degree to which anthrax was a serious national problem.

Authors: Berger, Charles., Johnson, Joel. and Lee, Eun-Ju.
first   previous   Page 10 of 35   next   last



background image
10
A total of 85 undergraduate students, 56 women and 29 men, enrolled in
communication courses at a large, West Coast university participated in the experiment
for extra credit. Participants’ ages ranged from 17 to 25 years old (M = 20.58, SD = 1.39).
Procedure
Participants completed two different questionnaires individually and
anonymously in a room by themselves. The first questionnaire’s instructions informed
participants than they would be reading and evaluating, depending upon their random
condition assignment, either one or two news stories that recently appeared on a local
television news broadcast. They were instructed to complete the booklet without looking
back to the story or stories. Participants assigned to the Anthrax Story Only condition
read an edited version of a Cable News Network story about Kathy Nguyen, a New York
City hospital worker who died from inhalation anthrax. The story summarized the events
leading up to her death and observed that no traces of anthrax spores had been found in
her apartment or work area. The story concluded Ms. Nguyen may have contracted her
anthrax infection from a source other than contaminated mail. Before reading the anthrax
story, individuals assigned to the Anthrax Story + Traffic Deaths Story condition read a
news report about projected traffic deaths in the United States during the fourth quarter of
2001. The story included National Safety Council statistics indicating that between 1
October and 31 December 2001, approximately 10,000 Americans would die in traffic
accidents. The report observed that over 40,000 Americans die in traffic accidents yearly.
After reading the story or stories, participants completed a series of scales. They
first indicated on a series of 11-point bi-polar scales how the anthrax story made them
feel. They then indicated the degree to which anthrax was a serious national problem.


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.