All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Rationality and Context: Antidotes for Anthrax Anecdotes
Unformatted Document Text:  3 Rationality and Context: Antidotes for Anthrax Anecdotes Over the past few decades researchers and social commentators have expressed considerable concern over the degree to which the American public has become overly apprehensive about various threats and hazards. Wildavsky (1979) averred, "How extraordinary! The richest, longest-lived, best-protected, most resourceful civilization, with the highest degree of insight into its own technology, is on its way to becoming the most frightened" (p. 32). More recently Furedi (1997) has argued that both Americans and Western Europeans live in a culture of fear in which mere survival is viewed as a major accomplishment, thus undermining achievement standards. Others have observed that people are frequently more apprehensive about potential threats that are relatively improbable, while at the same time expressing too little concern about the occurrence of substantially more likely threats (Cohl, 1997; Glassner, 1999, Slovic, 1987). For example, people perceive the risk of being exposed to radiation from a nuclear reactor to be greater than that associated with such common activities as swimming, when it is much more likely that they will drown while swimming (Slovic, 1987). Distorted risk perceptions have been directly attributed to the ways in which the mass media present information about threats (Cohl, 1997; Crossen, 1994; De Becker, 2002; Glassner, 1999). In a similar vein, cultivation researchers have explored the links between the amount of exposure to television and viewers’ judgments of the prevalence of various threats (Davis & Mares, 1998; Mares, 1996; Morgan & Signorielli, 1990; Shrum, 2001; Shrum & O’Guinn, 1993). Analyses of media content have revealed that the world represented by television is inordinately violent and one far removed from the one most individuals experience in their everyday lives. This research further suggests that

Authors: Berger, Charles., Johnson, Joel. and Lee, Eun-Ju.
first   previous   Page 3 of 35   next   last



background image
3
Rationality and Context: Antidotes for Anthrax Anecdotes
Over the past few decades researchers and social commentators have expressed
considerable concern over the degree to which the American public has become overly
apprehensive about various threats and hazards. Wildavsky (1979) averred, "How
extraordinary! The richest, longest-lived, best-protected, most resourceful civilization,
with the highest degree of insight into its own technology, is on its way to becoming the
most frightened" (p. 32). More recently Furedi (1997) has argued that both Americans
and Western Europeans live in a culture of fear in which mere survival is viewed as a
major accomplishment, thus undermining achievement standards. Others have observed
that people are frequently more apprehensive about potential threats that are relatively
improbable, while at the same time expressing too little concern about the occurrence of
substantially more likely threats (Cohl, 1997; Glassner, 1999, Slovic, 1987). For example,
people perceive the risk of being exposed to radiation from a nuclear reactor to be greater
than that associated with such common activities as swimming, when it is much more
likely that they will drown while swimming (Slovic, 1987). Distorted risk perceptions
have been directly attributed to the ways in which the mass media present information
about threats (Cohl, 1997; Crossen, 1994; De Becker, 2002; Glassner, 1999).
In a similar vein, cultivation researchers have explored the links between the
amount of exposure to television and viewers’ judgments of the prevalence of various
threats (Davis & Mares, 1998; Mares, 1996; Morgan & Signorielli, 1990; Shrum, 2001;
Shrum & O’Guinn, 1993). Analyses of media content have revealed that the world
represented by television is inordinately violent and one far removed from the one most
individuals experience in their everyday lives. This research further suggests that


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.