All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Attributions and Outcomes: Hurtful Communication in Families
Unformatted Document Text:  Attributions and Outcomes 17 In accordance with our predictions for H 4a, responding to hurtful messages with behaviors such as decreasing the amount of calls made to family members, decreasing affection, rude actions, and/or pretending nothing was wrong, (i.e., Active Distancing, Distributive Communication, and Avoidance/Denial) were all found to be linked lower levels of relational satisfaction. However, contrary to our expectations, no connections were found between relational satisfaction and expressions of anger, resentment, or frustration (i.e., Negative Affect Expressions). Our findings did, however, approach significance (p = .054). Additionally, no support was found for the expected relationship between physically violent or threatening responses to hurt and relationship satisfaction. Our findings can best be explained by the possibility that violence is an anomaly in families and is rarely used as a means of responding to hurtful messages. Our results demonstrate that families appear to be able to use Integrative Communication to work through hurt (H 4b), thus echoing Feldman and Ridley’s (2000) assertion that a cooperative environment may act as the padding needed to protect relationships from resorting to violence in response to hurt. That is not to say that violence does not occur in families; however, in our study, most participants gave low ratings to violence as an option for handling hurt (M = 1.73, SD = 1.38). Participants who felt satisfied in their relationships reported engaging more in calm, direct, non-aggressive communication (i.e., Integrative Communication) in response to hurtful communication. This finding is consistent with previous research that has suggested a relationship between romantic couples’ use of integrative communication and feelings of overall satisfaction (Guerrero et al., 1995; Guerrero & Afifi, 1998). While our research indicated that family members engage in a variety of different behaviors to respond to hurt, it appears that the

Authors: Young, Stacy., Kubicka, Tara., Tucker, Caralyn., McCoy, Jamie., Kanaan, Kanaan., Johnson, Jarvis., Chavez-Appel, Desi. and Dinger, Michelle.
first   previous   Page 17 of 23   next   last



background image
Attributions and Outcomes
17
In accordance with our predictions for H 4a, responding to hurtful messages with
behaviors such as decreasing the amount of calls made to family members, decreasing affection,
rude actions, and/or pretending nothing was wrong, (i.e., Active Distancing, Distributive
Communication, and Avoidance/Denial) were all found to be linked lower levels of relational
satisfaction. However, contrary to our expectations, no connections were found between
relational satisfaction and expressions of anger, resentment, or frustration (i.e., Negative Affect
Expressions). Our findings did, however, approach significance (p = .054).
Additionally, no support was found for the expected relationship between physically
violent or threatening responses to hurt and relationship satisfaction. Our findings can best be
explained by the possibility that violence is an anomaly in families and is rarely used as a means
of responding to hurtful messages. Our results demonstrate that families appear to be able to use
Integrative Communication to work through hurt (H 4b), thus echoing Feldman and Ridley’s
(2000) assertion that a cooperative environment may act as the padding needed to protect
relationships from resorting to violence in response to hurt. That is not to say that violence does
not occur in families; however, in our study, most participants gave low ratings to violence as an
option for handling hurt (M = 1.73, SD = 1.38).
Participants who felt satisfied in their relationships reported engaging more in calm,
direct, non-aggressive communication (i.e., Integrative Communication) in response to hurtful
communication. This finding is consistent with previous research that has suggested a
relationship between romantic couples’ use of integrative communication and feelings of overall
satisfaction (Guerrero et al., 1995; Guerrero & Afifi, 1998). While our research indicated that
family members engage in a variety of different behaviors to respond to hurt, it appears that the


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 17 of 23   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.