All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Attributions and Outcomes: Hurtful Communication in Families
Unformatted Document Text:  Attributions and Outcomes 4 responses to hurtful messages, they did not provide an exhaustive list of such responses (Vangelisti & Crumley, 1998). Moreover, results indicated that the association between people’s responses to hurt and the quality of their relationship (relationship satisfaction) were important in understanding the perceived impact of hurtful messages (Vangelisti & Crumley, 1998). However, attributions for hurtful messages were not investigated, and participant’s relationships were not limited to family members. Vangelisti and Crumley (1998) argued that there are unique qualities underlying family relationships that make them more vulnerable to feelings of hurt, and therefore further research unique to these relationships is needed. Hurt may be defined as an emotion aroused by negative attributions made about why a violation occurred (Vangelisti, 1994). Therefore, relationship satisfaction and attributions made about hurtful messages may be particularly relevant to understanding the communicative responses to hurtful communication in families. The purpose of the present paper is to examine the attributions made about messages labeled by family member recipients as “hurtful.” Specifically, the focus of this study investigates (a) how senders and receivers perceive hurtful communication differently with regard to intentionality and relational satisfaction, and (b) how attributions of intentionality and relational satisfaction affect recipients’ communicative responses to those messages. Attribution Theory The attributions made about communication behavior often produce a distinct set of emotions. Heider (1958) explained that in interpersonal interactions, message receivers make attributions or inferences about the causality and responsibility underlying the observed behavior. These attributions then affect the responses to the given behavior (Weiner, 1991). Receivers do not observe the causes of another’s behaviors directly, but rather ascribe certain

Authors: Young, Stacy., Kubicka, Tara., Tucker, Caralyn., McCoy, Jamie., Kanaan, Kanaan., Johnson, Jarvis., Chavez-Appel, Desi. and Dinger, Michelle.
first   previous   Page 4 of 23   next   last



background image
Attributions and Outcomes
4
responses to hurtful messages, they did not provide an exhaustive list of such responses
(Vangelisti & Crumley, 1998). Moreover, results indicated that the association between people’s
responses to hurt and the quality of their relationship (relationship satisfaction) were important in
understanding the perceived impact of hurtful messages (Vangelisti & Crumley, 1998).
However, attributions for hurtful messages were not investigated, and participant’s relationships
were not limited to family members. Vangelisti and Crumley (1998) argued that there are unique
qualities underlying family relationships that make them more vulnerable to feelings of hurt, and
therefore further research unique to these relationships is needed.
Hurt may be defined as an emotion aroused by negative attributions made about why a
violation occurred (Vangelisti, 1994). Therefore, relationship satisfaction and attributions made
about hurtful messages may be particularly relevant to understanding the communicative
responses to hurtful communication in families. The purpose of the present paper is to examine
the attributions made about messages labeled by family member recipients as “hurtful.”
Specifically, the focus of this study investigates (a) how senders and receivers perceive hurtful
communication differently with regard to intentionality and relational satisfaction, and (b) how
attributions of intentionality and relational satisfaction affect recipients’ communicative
responses to those messages.
Attribution Theory
The attributions made about communication behavior often produce a distinct set of
emotions. Heider (1958) explained that in interpersonal interactions, message receivers make
attributions or inferences about the causality and responsibility underlying the observed
behavior. These attributions then affect the responses to the given behavior (Weiner, 1991).
Receivers do not observe the causes of another’s behaviors directly, but rather ascribe certain


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 23   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.