All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Accounts of Single-fatherhood: A case study
Unformatted Document Text:  SINGLE FATHERS 2 Accounts of Single-fatherhood: A Case Study Single-fatherhood has nearly doubled in the US population during the last decade. Indeed, a comparison of the 1990 and 2000 Census indicates that the number of single-fathers living with children under the age of six as well as between the ages of 6 to 17 is growing (United States Census Bureau, 2002). Although single-fathers are heading more and more households, they are often treated as if they are invisible and have been ignored by academicians and policy experts (Bernstein, 1992). Indeed, despite the growing population of single-fathers in the “real world,” little extant literature exists that examines the experience of single-fatherhood and how fathers communicate that experience and reality to their children. Types of Families Much has changed in the past few decades regarding the composition of American families. Indeed, the seemingly impermeable boundaries of the traditional family have become permeable. As a result, much more diverse representations of family exist. Nevertheless, laypersons as well as scholars often struggle with how to define family (Fine, 1993; Trost, 1988, 1990). In regard to the struggle of defining family, Trost (1990) argued, “Apparently, what is familiar is the term only, certainly not the concept” (p. 431). Much of the extant literature on family relationships and family communication focuses on traditional two parent families. Of the existing literature on single parents, much of the focus lies with the single-mother household versus the single-father household (Hilton, Desrochers, & Devall, 2001). Many studies that do examine single-fathers focus on their noncustodial or absenteeism status. Indeed, many of the single parent reports and briefs available from various government sources (e.g., the Census) focus on the single-mother. Similarly, from a social and

Authors: Emmers-Sommer, Tara., Rhea, David., Triplett, Laura. and O'Neill, Bell.
first   previous   Page 2 of 25   next   last



background image
SINGLE FATHERS
2
Accounts of Single-fatherhood: A Case Study
Single-fatherhood has nearly doubled in the US population during the last decade.
Indeed, a comparison of the 1990 and 2000 Census indicates that the number of single-fathers
living with children under the age of six as well as between the ages of 6 to 17 is growing
(United States Census Bureau, 2002). Although single-fathers are heading more and more
households, they are often treated as if they are invisible and have been ignored by academicians
and policy experts (Bernstein, 1992). Indeed, despite the growing population of single-fathers in
the “real world,” little extant literature exists that examines the experience of single-fatherhood
and how fathers communicate that experience and reality to their children.
Types of Families
Much has changed in the past few decades regarding the composition of American
families. Indeed, the seemingly impermeable boundaries of the traditional family have become
permeable. As a result, much more diverse representations of family exist. Nevertheless,
laypersons as well as scholars often struggle with how to define family (Fine, 1993; Trost, 1988,
1990). In regard to the struggle of defining family, Trost (1990) argued, “Apparently, what is
familiar is the term only, certainly not the concept” (p. 431).
Much of the extant literature on family relationships and family communication focuses
on traditional two parent families. Of the existing literature on single parents, much of the focus
lies with the single-mother household versus the single-father household (Hilton, Desrochers, &
Devall, 2001). Many studies that do examine single-fathers focus on their noncustodial or
absenteeism status. Indeed, many of the single parent reports and briefs available from various
government sources (e.g., the Census) focus on the single-mother. Similarly, from a social and


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 2 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.