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Accounts of Single-fatherhood: A case study
Unformatted Document Text:  SINGLE FATHERS 8 attitudes toward gender roles and families. As a reliability check, items 7, 8, and 9 were reverse- scored to strengthen reliability. Recruitment of Participants The researchers attended various communication courses at a large, southwestern university to solicit potential participants. The researchers indicated to the students enrolled in the various courses that in order to participate in the study, they needed to be a single-father who was at least 18 years of age with primary, shared, or visitation custody of their child. In addition, students were informed that if they did not fit the criteria for inclusion as a participant in the study, they could refer someone they knew who did fit the criteria for inclusion in the study. Finally, a third option existed for individuals who did not fit the first two options. The third option involved reading a book chapter on single-fatherhood and writing a one-to-two page critique of the chapter. Students who participated in any of the three options received extra credit. Procedures As mentioned earlier, the purpose of this study is to examine single-fathers’ experiences of being a single-father and how they communicate about being a single-father to their child. Participants were instructed to come to a room on campus on a weekday evening. Upon arriving, participants were asked to focus on the child that they had primary, shared, or visitation custody of when participating in the study. Single-fathers who had a custody arrangement with more than one child were asked to focus on the child who spends the most time with them. In the event that more than one child spends equal time with the single-father, single-fathers were asked to focus on the oldest child. Participants were asked numerous demographic and open- and closed-ended questions regarding their experience with single-fatherhood. Participants were asked to write

Authors: Emmers-Sommer, Tara., Rhea, David., Triplett, Laura. and O'Neill, Bell.
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SINGLE FATHERS
8
attitudes toward gender roles and families. As a reliability check, items 7, 8, and 9 were reverse-
scored to strengthen reliability.
Recruitment of Participants
The researchers attended various communication courses at a large, southwestern
university to solicit potential participants. The researchers indicated to the students enrolled in
the various courses that in order to participate in the study, they needed to be a single-father who
was at least 18 years of age with primary, shared, or visitation custody of their child. In addition,
students were informed that if they did not fit the criteria for inclusion as a participant in the
study, they could refer someone they knew who did fit the criteria for inclusion in the study.
Finally, a third option existed for individuals who did not fit the first two options. The third
option involved reading a book chapter on single-fatherhood and writing a one-to-two page
critique of the chapter. Students who participated in any of the three options received extra
credit.
Procedures
As mentioned earlier, the purpose of this study is to examine single-fathers’ experiences
of being a single-father and how they communicate about being a single-father to their child.
Participants were instructed to come to a room on campus on a weekday evening. Upon arriving,
participants were asked to focus on the child that they had primary, shared, or visitation custody
of when participating in the study. Single-fathers who had a custody arrangement with more than
one child were asked to focus on the child who spends the most time with them. In the event that
more than one child spends equal time with the single-father, single-fathers were asked to focus
on the oldest child. Participants were asked numerous demographic and open- and closed-ended
questions regarding their experience with single-fatherhood. Participants were asked to write


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