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Effects of Representational Similarity on Deindividuation and Conformity to Group Norms in Computer-Mediated Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  12 cautious decision was presented as the group norm, the sign of the z-score was reversed so that positive scores indicated a move toward conformity with the group opinion, whereas negative scores indicated anti-conformity. Since the reliability of z-scores across four critical scenarios was not high, a repeated measures ANOVA was used. The individuation index was created based on the differences in the participant’s ratings of each ostensible interactant along various perceptual dimensions. First, each participant indicated how well each adjective described Partner 1 and Partner 2 on a ten-point Likert scale, ranging from describes very poorly to describes very well. Then, the indices for social attractiveness (likable, attractive, pleasant, friendly; α = .80 for Partner 1 and α = .85 for Partner 2), competence (competent, intelligent, reasonable, informed; α = .88 for Partner 1and α = .90 for Partner 2), trustworthiness (trustworthy, reliable, honest; α = .77 and for Partner 1 and α = .83 for Partner 2), perceived similarity to oneself (thinks like me, shares my belief, similar to me; α = .93 for Partner 1and α = .97 for Partner 2), argument quality (convincing, persuasive, relevant, valid; α = . 89 for Partner 1and α = .91 for Partner 2) were created. Next, the absolute difference between the ratings for Partner 1 and Partner 2 was calculated along each dimension. Finally, the difference scores along these five dimensions were summed to create the individuation index, which reflects the overall differentiation between two interactants ( α = .75): The higher the score, the greater individuation. Results Manipulation check First, in order to confirm that the inter-group encounter did enhance the salience of their group identity defined in terms of school affiliation, the group identification with their schoolmates was measured. Since direct measure of salience (i.e., how attentive they were to the group vs. personal aspect of the self during the interaction) would be reactive in nature, we used identification with the group as substitutes for measures of salience (Postmes, Spears, & Lea,

Authors: Lee, Eun-Ju.
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cautious decision was presented as the group norm, the sign of the z-score was reversed so that
positive scores indicated a move toward conformity with the group opinion, whereas negative
scores indicated anti-conformity. Since the reliability of z-scores across four critical scenarios
was not high, a repeated measures ANOVA was used.
The individuation index was created based on the differences in the participant’s ratings
of each ostensible interactant along various perceptual dimensions. First, each participant
indicated how well each adjective described Partner 1 and Partner 2 on a ten-point Likert scale,
ranging from describes very poorly to describes very well. Then, the indices for social
attractiveness (likable, attractive, pleasant, friendly;
α
= .80 for Partner 1 and
α
= .85 for Partner
2), competence (competent, intelligent, reasonable, informed;
α
= .88 for Partner 1and
α
= .90 for
Partner 2), trustworthiness (trustworthy, reliable, honest;
α
= .77 and for Partner 1 and
α
= .83 for
Partner 2), perceived similarity to oneself (thinks like me, shares my belief, similar to me;
α
= .93
for Partner 1and
α
= .97 for Partner 2), argument quality (convincing, persuasive, relevant, valid;
α
= . 89 for Partner 1and
α
= .91 for Partner 2) were created. Next, the absolute difference
between the ratings for Partner 1 and Partner 2 was calculated along each dimension. Finally, the
difference scores along these five dimensions were summed to create the individuation index,
which reflects the overall differentiation between two interactants (
α
= .75): The higher the score,
the greater individuation.
Results
Manipulation check
First, in order to confirm that the inter-group encounter did enhance the salience of their
group identity defined in terms of school affiliation, the group identification with their
schoolmates was measured. Since direct measure of salience (i.e., how attentive they were to the
group vs. personal aspect of the self during the interaction) would be reactive in nature, we used
identification with the group as substitutes for measures of salience (Postmes, Spears, & Lea,


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