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Effects of Representational Similarity on Deindividuation and Conformity to Group Norms in Computer-Mediated Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  19 subsequent in-group bias (e.g., Allen & Wilder, 1975). Thus, even though people perceived the same-charactered partners more similar to themselves than the different-charactered counterparts, they might not have felt greater affiliation with them as a group. Second, the instrument used to measure perceived similarity focuses more on personal identity than social identity (e.g., Turner, 1999). That is, the questionnaire items asked the participant to make a within-group comparison between one’s personal self and each individual group member, thereby shifting the participant’s attention to the personal-level perception. Therefore, to clarify the role group identification plays in the social influence process, it would be necessary to directly measure group identification and examine its relationship with deindividuation and conformity. H2: Deindividuation, when it is triggered by uniform visual representation, will lead to greater group identification, which will in turn facilitate conformity to group norms. Method Participants Participants were 55 (25 male and 30 female) college undergraduates enrolled in a communication class. They received course credit for their participation. Procedure Participants were randomly assigned to either the different-character or the same- character condition. Since the character manipulation triggered deindividuation only in the inter- group context, all participants were told that they would interact with students from other universities. Otherwise, procedures were identical to those employed in Experiment 1. Measures Conformity scores were calculated precisely as in Experiment 1, adjusted by each individual’s risk-taking tendency. Again, a repeated measures ANOVA was used for analysis of the effect on conformity. Likewise, the individuation index was created as in Experiment, on the basis of the participant’s ratings of each ostensible interactant on a ten-point Likert scale (“describes very

Authors: Lee, Eun-Ju.
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subsequent in-group bias (e.g., Allen & Wilder, 1975). Thus, even though people perceived the
same-charactered partners more similar to themselves than the different-charactered counterparts,
they might not have felt greater affiliation with them as a group. Second, the instrument used to
measure perceived similarity focuses more on personal identity than social identity (e.g., Turner,
1999). That is, the questionnaire items asked the participant to make a within-group comparison
between one’s personal self and each individual group member, thereby shifting the participant’s
attention to the personal-level perception. Therefore, to clarify the role group identification plays
in the social influence process, it would be necessary to directly measure group identification and
examine its relationship with deindividuation and conformity.
H2: Deindividuation, when it is triggered by uniform visual representation, will lead to
greater group identification, which will in turn facilitate conformity to group norms.
Method
Participants
Participants were 55 (25 male and 30 female) college undergraduates enrolled in a
communication class. They received course credit for their participation.
Procedure
Participants were randomly assigned to either the different-character or the same-
character condition. Since the character manipulation triggered deindividuation only in the inter-
group context, all participants were told that they would interact with students from other
universities. Otherwise, procedures were identical to those employed in Experiment 1.
Measures
Conformity scores were calculated precisely as in Experiment 1, adjusted by each
individual’s risk-taking tendency. Again, a repeated measures ANOVA was used for analysis of
the effect on conformity.
Likewise, the individuation index was created as in Experiment, on the basis of the
participant’s ratings of each ostensible interactant on a ten-point Likert scale (“describes very


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