All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Effects of Representational Similarity on Deindividuation and Conformity to Group Norms in Computer-Mediated Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  9 and thus were not likely to identify with the interactants who allegedly belonged to different social categories. Thus, the notion that a salient group identity (shared with interactants) is required for deindividuation to facilitate group-normative behaviors (Postmes et al., 2001) will be challenged, if the inter-group participants display greater conformity to group norms when deindividuated than when individuated. When the awareness of one’s social self is elevated, people might become more sensitive to situational cues that potentially activate identification with those in the immediate environment, without necessarily being categorized as a group. According to Ziller’s (1964) theory of individuation, individuation (social differentiation) and deindividuation (social non-differentiation) are the two poles between which behavior moves in a permanent oscillation. For example, similarity between persons who are forced to be in a close personal relationship encourages opposite behaviors so as to avoid confusions in self- perception and in the perception of oneself by observers. There is a continual search for the achievement of equilibrium between these two poles such that those who had been previously deindividuated by the experimenter tended to adopt more markedly singular behavior than those of others who had not gone through this experience (Maslach, 1974). Such being the case, the participants in the inter-group condition would likely experience heightened needs for social non- differentiation: They were made conscious of their group membership, but surrounded by those belonging to different social categories. Thus, in pursuit of a shared common identity, they would become more responsive to uniform representation and adopt it as a group-defining cue. By contrast, those in the interpersonal condition were not primed to particularly heed to their social self, for their partners all belong to the same social category. Thus, when all discussants, including themselves, are represented in the identical form with no individuating cues, they would likely seek a way to proclaim their uniqueness. Voicing an opinion different from the rest of the group is one of the ways to achieve social differentiation (Codol, 1984). H5: In the inter-group context, people will show greater conformity to the group norm

Authors: Lee, Eun-Ju.
first   previous   Page 9 of 36   next   last



background image
9
and thus were not likely to identify with the interactants who allegedly belonged to different
social categories. Thus, the notion that a salient group identity (shared with interactants) is
required for deindividuation to facilitate group-normative behaviors (Postmes et al., 2001) will be
challenged, if the inter-group participants display greater conformity to group norms when
deindividuated than when individuated. When the awareness of one’s social self is elevated,
people might become more sensitive to situational cues that potentially activate identification
with those in the immediate environment, without necessarily being categorized as a group.
According to Ziller’s (1964) theory of individuation, individuation (social differentiation)
and deindividuation (social non-differentiation) are the two poles between which behavior moves
in a permanent oscillation. For example, similarity between persons who are forced to be in a
close personal relationship encourages opposite behaviors so as to avoid confusions in self-
perception and in the perception of oneself by observers. There is a continual search for the
achievement of equilibrium between these two poles such that those who had been previously
deindividuated by the experimenter tended to adopt more markedly singular behavior than those
of others who had not gone through this experience (Maslach, 1974). Such being the case, the
participants in the inter-group condition would likely experience heightened needs for social non-
differentiation: They were made conscious of their group membership, but surrounded by those
belonging to different social categories. Thus, in pursuit of a shared common identity, they would
become more responsive to uniform representation and adopt it as a group-defining cue. By
contrast, those in the interpersonal condition were not primed to particularly heed to their social
self, for their partners all belong to the same social category. Thus, when all discussants,
including themselves, are represented in the identical form with no individuating cues, they
would likely seek a way to proclaim their uniqueness. Voicing an opinion different from the rest
of the group is one of the ways to achieve social differentiation (Codol, 1984).
H5: In the inter-group context, people will show greater conformity to the group norm


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 36   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.