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Environmental Concern, Patterns of Television Viewing, and Pro-Environmental Behaviors
Unformatted Document Text:  TV-Environment 13 [Table 2 about here] There are only two variables that are significant predictors of progressive drama viewing across the two surveys: sex (1999: β = .10; 2000: β = .10) and race (1999: β = .05; 2000: β = .09). By contrast, there are seven very strong and consistent predictors of traditional drama viewing, with age (1999: β = .20; 2000: β = .21) retaining the strongest relationship with this type of television use. More important for this paper, environmental concern is not a consistently significant predictor of either form of television drama use. Predictors of Pro-Environmental Behaviors Four of the exogenous variables have strong direct effects on pro-environmental behaviors: age (1999: β = .17; 2000: β = .20), sex (1999: β = .12; 2000: β = .12), education (1999: β =.15; 2000: β = .10), and race (1999: β = -.05; 2000: β = -.07). Those who are older, female, better educated, and non-African American tend to adopt more pro-environmental behaviors. The attitudinal measure of environmental concern is by far the strongest predictor of pro-environmental behaviors (1999: β = .39; 2000: β = .35), confirming H3 (see Table 3). [Table 3 about here] Two of the five television use variables are significant predictors of pro-environmental behaviors, public affairs (1999: β = .05; 2000: β =.05) and nature documentaries (1999: β = .04; 2000: β =.05). In short, there is a clear positive direct relationship between fact-based television use and individual-level environmental activities (see Table 3). Entering both of these variables into a separate final block for respective regression equations produces significant incremental R 2 statistics: Public affairs (1999: Incr. R 2 (%) = 0.3; 2000: Incr. R 2 (%) = 0.2), nature shows (1999: Incr. R 2 (%) = 0.3; 2000: Incr. R 2 (%) = 0.3). This combination of results confirms H4 and H5. Both of these forms of television use contribute in unique positive ways to pro-environmental behaviors, above and beyond the influence of a host of demographic, contextual, various television use variables, as well as the attitudinal measure of environmental concern. However, we must also recognize that these effects are relatively small in terms of their overall variance accounted for. Notably, the three forms of fictional-based television use were not found to retain a significant direct relationship with pro-environmental behaviors. Thus, the second research question produced little in terms of significant results. This pattern of results falls in line with the content analysis completed by McComas et al. (2001)

Authors: Holbert, R. Lance., Kwak, Nojin. and Shah, Dhavan.
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TV-Environment 13
[Table 2 about here]
There are only two variables that are significant predictors of progressive drama viewing across the two
surveys: sex (1999:
β
= .10; 2000:
β
= .10) and race (1999:
β
= .05; 2000:
β
= .09). By contrast, there are seven very strong and consistent predictors of traditional drama viewing, with age
(1999:
β
= .20; 2000:
β
= .21) retaining the strongest relationship with this type of television use.
More important
for this paper, environmental concern is not a consistently significant predictor of either form of television drama
use.
Predictors of Pro-Environmental Behaviors
Four of the exogenous variables have strong direct effects on pro-environmental behaviors: age (1999:
β
=
.17; 2000:
β
= .20), sex (1999:
β
= .12; 2000:
β
= .12), education (1999:
β
=.15; 2000:
β
= .10), and race (1999:
β
=
-.05; 2000:
β
= -.07). Those who are older, female, better educated, and non-African American tend to adopt more
pro-environmental behaviors. The attitudinal measure of environmental concern is by far the strongest predictor of
pro-environmental behaviors (1999:
β
= .39; 2000:
β
= .35), confirming H3 (see Table 3).
[Table 3 about here]
Two of the five television use variables are significant predictors of pro-environmental behaviors, public
affairs (1999:
β
= .05; 2000:
β
=.05) and nature documentaries (1999:
β
= .04; 2000:
β
=.05). In short, there is a
clear positive direct relationship between fact-based television use and individual-level environmental activities (see
Table 3). Entering both of these variables into a separate final block for respective regression equations produces
significant incremental R
2
statistics: Public affairs (1999: Incr. R
2
(%) = 0.3; 2000: Incr. R
2
(%) = 0.2), nature shows
(1999: Incr. R
2
(%) = 0.3; 2000: Incr. R
2
(%) = 0.3). This combination of results confirms H4 and H5. Both of these
forms of television use contribute in unique positive ways to pro-environmental behaviors, above and beyond the
influence of a host of demographic, contextual, various television use variables, as well as the attitudinal measure of
environmental concern. However, we must also recognize that these effects are relatively small in terms of their
overall variance accounted for.
Notably, the three forms of fictional-based television use were not found to retain a significant direct
relationship with pro-environmental behaviors. Thus, the second research question produced little in terms of
significant results. This pattern of results falls in line with the content analysis completed by McComas et al. (2001)


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