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Easy elaboration: The subjective experience of message processing and persuasion
Unformatted Document Text:  Subjective Experience 12 enforcement. Next, participants read the argument and subsequently completed a subjective experience task. Afterwards, participants provided their evaluation of photo enforcement, their intent to seek more information about it, and were provided an opportunity to request more information. After completing the experimental survey, participants completed a subjective experience induction check. They indicated what percentage of other university students could complete the same task, i.e. providing that many points. Then, participants evaluated their own experience with the task. Instrumentation Attitudes. Attitudes were assessed with four 7-point, semantic differential items. Items asked participants how they felt about photo enforcement with anchors such as “favorable/unfavorable,” “like/dislike,” and “agree/disagree.” Responses were scored such that higher scores indicated more approval of the topic, SI α = .96. Information seeking intent. Participants’ intent to seek more information was assessed with a single, dichotomous item, which asked if the respondents intended to find out more information about the topic. Respondents marked either yes or no in response. Information seeking behavior. Participants were provided with an opportunity to request more information about their topic. Participants could write their email address on a form at the end of the survey. They were instructed to tear off the form and bring it to the experimenter if they wanted more information. The form indicated that information would be sent to them within one week. Subjective experience induction check. Participants were asked what percentage of students at their university could complete the first task by providing the necessary number of

Authors: Smith, Rachel., Goei, Ryan. and Lindsey, Lisa.
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Subjective Experience 12
enforcement. Next, participants read the argument and subsequently completed a subjective
experience task. Afterwards, participants provided their evaluation of photo enforcement, their
intent to seek more information about it, and were provided an opportunity to request more
information.
After completing the experimental survey, participants completed a subjective experience
induction check. They indicated what percentage of other university students could complete the
same task, i.e. providing that many points. Then, participants evaluated their own experience
with the task.
Instrumentation
Attitudes. Attitudes were assessed with four 7-point, semantic differential items. Items
asked participants how they felt about photo enforcement with anchors such as
“favorable/unfavorable,” “like/dislike,” and “agree/disagree.” Responses were scored such that
higher scores indicated more approval of the topic, SI
α
= .96.
Information seeking intent. Participants’ intent to seek more information was assessed
with a single, dichotomous item, which asked if the respondents intended to find out more
information about the topic. Respondents marked either yes or no in response.
Information seeking behavior. Participants were provided with an opportunity to request
more information about their topic. Participants could write their email address on a form at the
end of the survey. They were instructed to tear off the form and bring it to the experimenter if
they wanted more information. The form indicated that information would be sent to them within
one week.
Subjective experience induction check. Participants were asked what percentage of
students at their university could complete the first task by providing the necessary number of


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