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Easy elaboration: The subjective experience of message processing and persuasion
Unformatted Document Text:  Subjective Experience 5 Evidence in support of subjective experience as information is mounting (see Schwarz, 1998 for a review). For example, participants recalling 6 examples of their own assertive behaviors evaluate themselves as more assertive than those who recall 12 examples (Schwarz et al., 1991). The relationship generalizes to evaluative judgments of recalled memories. After recalling a difficult number (12) of childhood experiences, study participants rated their childhood as more pleasant when they were told that pleasant experiences, versus unpleasant experiences, are difficult to recall (Winkielman & Schwarz, 2001). As programmatic research continues in cognitive psychology, we turn to communication research in cognitive operations and subjective experiences. Subjective Experience and Message Processing Subjective message construct theory (Morley, 1987) was developed to shed light on how the cognitive tests a receiver applies to a message affect its persuasiveness. To be sure, both source and message effects (McCroskey & Young, 1981; Slater & Rouner, 1997; Stiff, 1986; Warren, 1969) are active during such a persuasive episode. Morley (1987) suggested that message information needed to pass tests of importance, novelty, and plausibility before belief change would occur. He based his theory’s logic in the mathematics of “determining the joint probabilities of two independent and nonindependent events” (p. 186). The base algebraic expression is )) ( ))( ( ) | ( ( ) ( D p C p D C p C p − = ∆ α where a change in a person’s subjective estimation of the claim is a function of the probability of the datum p(D) multiplied by the probability of a claim given the datum p (C | D) minus the probability of the claim without any data p(C). For example, suppose a person believes that running provides health benefits (.50), but has little belief that running would be a good exercise

Authors: Smith, Rachel., Goei, Ryan. and Lindsey, Lisa.
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Subjective Experience 5
Evidence in support of subjective experience as information is mounting (see Schwarz,
1998 for a review). For example, participants recalling 6 examples of their own assertive
behaviors evaluate themselves as more assertive than those who recall 12 examples (Schwarz et
al., 1991). The relationship generalizes to evaluative judgments of recalled memories. After
recalling a difficult number (12) of childhood experiences, study participants rated their
childhood as more pleasant when they were told that pleasant experiences, versus unpleasant
experiences, are difficult to recall (Winkielman & Schwarz, 2001). As programmatic research
continues in cognitive psychology, we turn to communication research in cognitive operations
and subjective experiences.
Subjective Experience and Message Processing
Subjective message construct theory (Morley, 1987) was developed to shed light on how
the cognitive tests a receiver applies to a message affect its persuasiveness. To be sure, both
source and message effects (McCroskey & Young, 1981; Slater & Rouner, 1997; Stiff, 1986;
Warren, 1969) are active during such a persuasive episode. Morley (1987) suggested that
message information needed to pass tests of importance, novelty, and plausibility before belief
change would occur. He based his theory’s logic in the mathematics of “determining the joint
probabilities of two independent and nonindependent events” (p. 186). The base algebraic
expression is
))
(
))(
(
)
|
(
(
)
(
D
p
C
p
D
C
p
C
p
=
α
where a change in a person’s subjective estimation of the claim is a function of the probability of
the datum p(D) multiplied by the probability of a claim given the datum p (C | D) minus the
probability of the claim without any data p(C). For example, suppose a person believes that
running provides health benefits (.50), but has little belief that running would be a good exercise


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