All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Affective-News Theory: Effects of Narrative Structure on Suspense, Curiosity, and Enjoyment While Reading News and Novels
Unformatted Document Text:  News Narratives 19 than that for the ’inverted pyramid’ (H 5 ). The omission structure also produced greater reading enjoyment than the classic organization of news reports (H 6 ). These effects emerged in the pretest and in the main study. The pilot study had substantiated effects of the narrative structure on curiosity but not on suspense. We attribute this to a lack of distinct initiating events in this first empirical approach, whereas the pretest and the main experiment used narrative forms that followed a very systematic schema detailed in specific text segments. Thus, the impact of narrative structures of texts on suspense, curiosity, and reading enjoyment attained substantial empirical support. However, the fact that these effects materialized independent of the texts’ authenticity may be the most surprising result. Whether participants were confronted with news articles or with novel excerpts was inconsequential for the experience of suspense, of curiosity, and for the reading enjoyment. By the same token, the presentation had been shown to convince on- lookers to judge a realistic report or a fictional essay. This results may not surprise practitioners who already observed that "newspapers are essentially putting back the word ’story’ into the term ’newspaper story,’ restoring what newspaper writing had for so many years lacked--action, true-to-life characters, point of view, and voice--a lot of those good things and writing techniques that, I think, only the shortsighted think belong exclusively to fiction" (Vare, 2000, p. 19). Compared to other studies where participants have been verbally instructed that content was real or fictitious, the manipulation used in the present investigation carries more ecological validity. However, studies using explicit declaration of authenticity as manipulation, typically in the realm of media-violence research, have repeatedly shown stronger reactions to supposedly real-life depictions (e.g. Atkin, 1983, Feshbach, 1972, Geen, 1975, Geen & Rakosky, 1973, Thomas & Tell, 1974). As it stands, responses on specific experiential dimensions turn out to be independent of authenticity, which is surprising in the light of most communication research. It is conventional wisdom and unquestioned implicit knowledge that reality and fiction in the media are two different worlds. Affective reactions on the audience’ part, however, are obviously not an outcome of authenticity but depend on presentational

Authors: Knobloch, Silvia. and Carpentier, Francesca.
first   previous   Page 19 of 32   next   last



background image
News Narratives 19
than that for the ’inverted pyramid’ (H
5
). The omission structure also produced greater reading
enjoyment than the classic organization of news reports (H
6
). These effects emerged in the pretest and
in the main study. The pilot study had substantiated effects of the narrative structure on curiosity but
not on suspense. We attribute this to a lack of distinct initiating events in this first empirical approach,
whereas the pretest and the main experiment used narrative forms that followed a very systematic
schema detailed in specific text segments.
Thus, the impact of narrative structures of texts on suspense, curiosity, and reading enjoyment
attained substantial empirical support. However, the fact that these effects materialized independent of
the texts’ authenticity may be the most surprising result. Whether participants were confronted with
news articles or with novel excerpts was inconsequential for the experience of suspense, of curiosity,
and for the reading enjoyment. By the same token, the presentation had been shown to convince on-
lookers to judge a realistic report or a fictional essay. This results may not surprise practitioners who
already observed that "newspapers are essentially putting back the word ’story’ into the term ’newspaper
story,’ restoring what newspaper writing had for so many years lacked--action, true-to-life characters,
point of view, and voice--a lot of those good things and writing techniques that, I think, only the
shortsighted think belong exclusively to fiction" (Vare, 2000, p. 19).
Compared to other studies where participants have been verbally instructed that content was
real or fictitious, the manipulation used in the present investigation carries more ecological validity.
However, studies using explicit declaration of authenticity as manipulation, typically in the realm of
media-violence research, have repeatedly shown stronger reactions to supposedly real-life depictions
(e.g. Atkin, 1983, Feshbach, 1972, Geen, 1975, Geen & Rakosky, 1973, Thomas & Tell, 1974). As it
stands, responses on specific experiential dimensions turn out to be independent of authenticity, which
is surprising in the light of most communication research. It is conventional wisdom and unquestioned
implicit knowledge that reality and fiction in the media are two different worlds. Affective reactions on
the audience’ part, however, are obviously not an outcome of authenticity but depend on presentational


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 19 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.