Citation

Like Father, Like Son: Continuity of Representational Style in Dynasties

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Abstract:

Political dynasties are common in democracies, but their consequences for representation are uncertain. In this study, we argue that members of dynasties are attractive to voters in part because they signal a familiar representational style. We make use of the fact that candidates for Japan’s House of Representatives cultivate personal bailiwicks to mobilize voters during elections, and often bequeath their local support organizations to designated successors when they retire. These successors are sometimes kin, but sometimes non-kin. We estimate the representational style of candidates from 1986-2009 with a quantitative text analysis of pre-electoral candidate manifestos, and find that kin successors adopt representational styles that are statistically indistinguishable from their predecessors, in contrast to non-kin successors. This continuity in representational style holds across different electoral systems.
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Association:
Name: American Political Science Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.apsanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1123478_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Catalinac, Amy. and Smith, Daniel. "Like Father, Like Son: Continuity of Representational Style in Dynasties" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1123478_index.html>

APA Citation:

Catalinac, A. L. and Smith, D. M. "Like Father, Like Son: Continuity of Representational Style in Dynasties" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1123478_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political dynasties are common in democracies, but their consequences for representation are uncertain. In this study, we argue that members of dynasties are attractive to voters in part because they signal a familiar representational style. We make use of the fact that candidates for Japan’s House of Representatives cultivate personal bailiwicks to mobilize voters during elections, and often bequeath their local support organizations to designated successors when they retire. These successors are sometimes kin, but sometimes non-kin. We estimate the representational style of candidates from 1986-2009 with a quantitative text analysis of pre-electoral candidate manifestos, and find that kin successors adopt representational styles that are statistically indistinguishable from their predecessors, in contrast to non-kin successors. This continuity in representational style holds across different electoral systems.


Similar Titles:
Like Father, Like Son: An Exploration of Family Sexual Abuse

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Like father NOT like son: engaging at-risk populations in research about intergenerational maltreatment discontinuity

Like Mother, Like Daughter? A Cross-Generational Analysis of the Intergenerational Effects of Mothers’ Conflict Styles on Daughters’ in the Mother-Daughter Dyad

Like Father Like Son? The Rhetoric of Human Rights and National Security in the Bush Presidencies


 
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