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Effects of Brain Laterality on Decoding Accuracy for Facial Displays of Emotion
Unformatted Document Text:  Effects of Brain 12 Some people cannot reliably be categorized as having standard or anomalous dominance, and so these form a third group. The mixed dominance (MD) group consists of those individuals who share the marker characteristics of both standard and anomalous dominance. As such, however, MD individuals do not necessarily exhibit a blend of left- and right-brained processing, nor do their abilities necessarily reside in the median between standard and anomalous dominance. Comparatively little is known about MD individuals. Since mixed dominance is not a distinctive category in itself, but is instead a default category for those individuals who have the markers of both SD and AD, those individuals who exhibit mixed dominance are sometimes excluded from the samples of hemispheric dominance studies to maximize systematic variance (as in the case of Bodary & Miller, 2000). Differences in the development of the brain structure (SD or AD) may also influence other cognitive systems, such as how the brain processes information. Geschwind and Galaburda (1987) determined that, for AD individuals, language would be more specialized in the right hemisphere than for SD individuals. Furthermore, the reverse would be true for the managing of nonverbal functions: in AD individuals nonverbal functions would be more specialized in the left hemisphere than for SD individuals. These differences in the hemispheric specialization of nonverbal functions between SD and AD individuals could influence the possessing of information in general, including the decoding of emotion displays, which, in humans, are primarily manifested facially. Decoding of Facial Emotion In SD people the right brain hemisphere would normally specialize in nonverbal communication and nonverbal decoding, which would include facial expressions and emotion (Andersen et al., 1979). How their decoding ability compares to that of AD people is unclear,

Authors: Floyd, Kory. and Mikkelson, Alan.
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Effects of Brain 12
Some people cannot reliably be categorized as having standard or anomalous dominance,
and so these form a third group. The mixed dominance (MD) group consists of those individuals
who share the marker characteristics of both standard and anomalous dominance. As such,
however, MD individuals do not necessarily exhibit a blend of left- and right-brained processing,
nor do their abilities necessarily reside in the median between standard and anomalous
dominance. Comparatively little is known about MD individuals. Since mixed dominance is not
a distinctive category in itself, but is instead a default category for those individuals who have
the markers of both SD and AD, those individuals who exhibit mixed dominance are sometimes
excluded from the samples of hemispheric dominance studies to maximize systematic variance
(as in the case of Bodary & Miller, 2000).
Differences in the development of the brain structure (SD or AD) may also influence
other cognitive systems, such as how the brain processes information. Geschwind and
Galaburda (1987) determined that, for AD individuals, language would be more specialized in
the right hemisphere than for SD individuals. Furthermore, the reverse would be true for the
managing of nonverbal functions: in AD individuals nonverbal functions would be more
specialized in the left hemisphere than for SD individuals. These differences in the hemispheric
specialization of nonverbal functions between SD and AD individuals could influence the
possessing of information in general, including the decoding of emotion displays, which, in
humans, are primarily manifested facially.
Decoding of Facial Emotion
In SD people the right brain hemisphere would normally specialize in nonverbal
communication and nonverbal decoding, which would include facial expressions and emotion
(Andersen et al., 1979). How their decoding ability compares to that of AD people is unclear,


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