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Effects of Brain Laterality on Decoding Accuracy for Facial Displays of Emotion
Unformatted Document Text:  Effects of Brain 16 Procedure Data were collected via a written questionnaire administered in undergraduate communication courses. Participants completed the questionnaire during regular class time and returned it to the researchers. Participation was voluntary and earned participants extra course credit. Duplicate questionnaires, completed by students who were enrolled in more than one of the participating classes, were removed prior to data entry and analysis. Measures To ascertain hemispheric dominance, we used a modified multiple-gate procedure. The modification was that, instead of having participants complete one assessment multiple times, we had them complete multiple assessments concurrently. The measures were those used by Bodary and Miller (2000), and included (1) Coren’s (1993) Handedness Inventory, which assesses the extent to which participants are right-handed, left-handed, or ambidextrous on a variety of common tasks; (2) a familial sinistrality questionnaire, which assesses the handedness of the participants’ blood relatives; and, (3) Rich’s (1989) learning and immune disorder inventory, which ascertains whether participants have been diagnosed and/or treated for several learning and immune disorders. The scales were scored in the manner recommended by Bodary and Miller (2000). Respondents received three markers of hemispheric dominance, one from each of the three measures. Scores on the Coren Handedness Inventory ranged from 12 to 36. Respondents scoring 19 or lower were classified as left-handed (signifying anomalous dominance); those scoring from 20 to 28 were classified as ambidextrous (signifying mixed dominance); and, those with scores higher than 28 were classified as right-handed (signifying standard dominance). A second marker came from the familial sinistrality questionnaire. If all first-degree relatives from a participant’s family of origin (mother, father, brother, sister) were

Authors: Floyd, Kory. and Mikkelson, Alan.
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Effects of Brain 16
Procedure
Data were collected via a written questionnaire administered in undergraduate
communication courses. Participants completed the questionnaire during regular class time and
returned it to the researchers. Participation was voluntary and earned participants extra course
credit. Duplicate questionnaires, completed by students who were enrolled in more than one of
the participating classes, were removed prior to data entry and analysis.
Measures
To ascertain hemispheric dominance, we used a modified multiple-gate procedure. The
modification was that, instead of having participants complete one assessment multiple times, we
had them complete multiple assessments concurrently. The measures were those used by Bodary
and Miller (2000), and included (1) Coren’s (1993) Handedness Inventory, which assesses the
extent to which participants are right-handed, left-handed, or ambidextrous on a variety of
common tasks; (2) a familial sinistrality questionnaire, which assesses the handedness of the
participants’ blood relatives; and, (3) Rich’s (1989) learning and immune disorder inventory,
which ascertains whether participants have been diagnosed and/or treated for several learning
and immune disorders. The scales were scored in the manner recommended by Bodary and
Miller (2000). Respondents received three markers of hemispheric dominance, one from each of
the three measures. Scores on the Coren Handedness Inventory ranged from 12 to 36.
Respondents scoring 19 or lower were classified as left-handed (signifying anomalous
dominance); those scoring from 20 to 28 were classified as ambidextrous (signifying mixed
dominance); and, those with scores higher than 28 were classified as right-handed (signifying
standard dominance). A second marker came from the familial sinistrality questionnaire. If all
first-degree relatives from a participant’s family of origin (mother, father, brother, sister) were


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