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Effects of Brain Laterality on Decoding Accuracy for Facial Displays of Emotion
Unformatted Document Text:  Effects of Brain 18 assess higher-order decoding skills. We opted in this study to use Part I only because it is the most efficient of the three parts of the test. Results On the basis of Bodary and Miller’s (2000) scoring procedure (described above), we classified 374 participants (147 male, 227 female) as having standard dominance, 100 participants (38 male, 62 female) as having mixed dominance, and 57 participants (23 male, 34 female) as having anomalous dominance. To examine the potential effects of sex and hemispheric dominance on decoding ability, we computed accuracy scores for each of the ten emotions by scoring participants’ responses as either accurate or inaccurate, based on Leathers and Emigh’s (1980) scoring key. Each instance of accurate decoding was scored as a “1” and each instance of inaccurate decoding was scored as a “0.” We then computed total accuracy scores by summing the accuracy scores for each individual emotion. Total accuracy scores, which have a theoretic range of 0 to 10, therefore represent the number of facial expressions of emotion that participants correctly identified. Accuracy scores for the sample as a whole ranged from 2 to 10, with a mean of 6.47 (SD = 1.55). The first three research questions asked whether hemispheric dominance, sex, and/or their interaction influence participants’ accuracy in decoding facial expressions of emotion. We analyzed potential differences using two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with sex and hemispheric dominance as the factors and total accuracy as the dependent variable. The covariate was participants’ age, which was included in the model because it manifested a significant linear relationship with accuracy, r (522) = .09, p = .04 (2-tailed). The ANCOVA indicated a significant main effect of sex, F (1, 517) = 5.27, p = .017, partial η 2 = .01, and a significant sex-by-hemispheric dominance interaction, F (2, 517) = 5.49, p < .001, partial η 2 =

Authors: Floyd, Kory. and Mikkelson, Alan.
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background image
Effects of Brain 18
assess higher-order decoding skills. We opted in this study to use Part I only because it is the
most efficient of the three parts of the test.
Results
On the basis of Bodary and Miller’s (2000) scoring procedure (described above), we
classified 374 participants (147 male, 227 female) as having standard dominance, 100
participants (38 male, 62 female) as having mixed dominance, and 57 participants (23 male, 34
female) as having anomalous dominance.
To examine the potential effects of sex and hemispheric dominance on decoding ability,
we computed accuracy scores for each of the ten emotions by scoring participants’ responses as
either accurate or inaccurate, based on Leathers and Emigh’s (1980) scoring key. Each instance
of accurate decoding was scored as a “1” and each instance of inaccurate decoding was scored as
a “0.” We then computed total accuracy scores by summing the accuracy scores for each
individual emotion. Total accuracy scores, which have a theoretic range of 0 to 10, therefore
represent the number of facial expressions of emotion that participants correctly identified.
Accuracy scores for the sample as a whole ranged from 2 to 10, with a mean of 6.47 (SD = 1.55).
The first three research questions asked whether hemispheric dominance, sex, and/or
their interaction influence participants’ accuracy in decoding facial expressions of emotion. We
analyzed potential differences using two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with sex and
hemispheric dominance as the factors and total accuracy as the dependent variable. The
covariate was participants’ age, which was included in the model because it manifested a
significant linear relationship with accuracy, r (522) = .09, p = .04 (2-tailed). The ANCOVA
indicated a significant main effect of sex, F (1, 517) = 5.27, p = .017, partial
η
2
= .01, and a
significant sex-by-hemispheric dominance interaction, F (2, 517) = 5.49, p < .001, partial
η
2
=


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