All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Effects of Brain Laterality on Decoding Accuracy for Facial Displays of Emotion
Unformatted Document Text:  Effects of Brain 4 relevance for the present study. The first, known as the principle of serviceable associated habits, recognizes that humans perform certain physical actions to meet specific needs or desires (e.g., plugging one’s nose in the presence of a foul odor, to block that odor from entering the nasal passages), and suggests that when people experience states of mind similar to those they experience when they have these needs or desires, “there is a tendency through the force of habit and association for the same movements to be performed, though they may not then be of the least use” (p. 28). For instance, when confronted with an offensive person or an especially bad idea, one might plug one’s nose to express contempt because one’s state of mind in such a situation is similar to that experienced in the presence of an offensive odor, causing one to plug one’s nose out of habit or association. The action is functional in the primary situation (i.e., protecting oneself from an offensive odor), but it is merely symbolic in the associated situations, conveying the message that “you (or your ideas) stink.” The second principle, known as the principle of antithesis, suggests that when we experience states of mind that are opposite those that lead to functional behaviors, we tend to perform the opposite behaviors (e.g., instead of plugging one’s nose, one takes a long, deep breath in). Inherent in these two principles is the idea that emotional states approximate mental states that are associated with physical needs. The need for protection from physical threats mentally approximates the emotional desire to protect oneself from offensive or distasteful ideas, interactions, or social situations, according to these principles, and therefore the behaviors associated with each are similar. Two important implications of Darwin’s analyses are that the repertoire of behaviors associated with each specific emotional state ought to be relatively stable across individuals and cultures, and that there ought to be relative consensus across individuals and cultures in recognizing the behaviors that convey each emotion. Darwin devoted much of

Authors: Floyd, Kory. and Mikkelson, Alan.
first   previous   Page 4 of 35   next   last



background image
Effects of Brain 4
relevance for the present study. The first, known as the principle of serviceable associated
habits, recognizes that humans perform certain physical actions to meet specific needs or desires
(e.g., plugging one’s nose in the presence of a foul odor, to block that odor from entering the
nasal passages), and suggests that when people experience states of mind similar to those they
experience when they have these needs or desires, “there is a tendency through the force of habit
and association for the same movements to be performed, though they may not then be of the
least use” (p. 28). For instance, when confronted with an offensive person or an especially bad
idea, one might plug one’s nose to express contempt because one’s state of mind in such a
situation is similar to that experienced in the presence of an offensive odor, causing one to plug
one’s nose out of habit or association. The action is functional in the primary situation (i.e.,
protecting oneself from an offensive odor), but it is merely symbolic in the associated situations,
conveying the message that “you (or your ideas) stink.” The second principle, known as the
principle of antithesis, suggests that when we experience states of mind that are opposite those
that lead to functional behaviors, we tend to perform the opposite behaviors (e.g., instead of
plugging one’s nose, one takes a long, deep breath in).
Inherent in these two principles is the idea that emotional states approximate mental
states that are associated with physical needs. The need for protection from physical threats
mentally approximates the emotional desire to protect oneself from offensive or distasteful ideas,
interactions, or social situations, according to these principles, and therefore the behaviors
associated with each are similar. Two important implications of Darwin’s analyses are that the
repertoire of behaviors associated with each specific emotional state ought to be relatively stable
across individuals and cultures, and that there ought to be relative consensus across individuals
and cultures in recognizing the behaviors that convey each emotion. Darwin devoted much of


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.