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CODE PINK Alert: The World Wide Web at Work in the Public Sphere
Unformatted Document Text:  CODE PINK Alert, 18 minute organization of protests, which was especially evident with the “emergency action alerts” sent to the list on the eve of the war. In addition to suggesting actions to take, the various modes of CMC provided information about the success of actions already taken. For example, the discussion board had several posts regarding the actions of March 15, 2003, which was a day of planned protests in Washington, D.C. and elsewhere. One woman provided a lengthy description of the march in Washington, D.C., which I excerpt here: Thousands of people showed up early morning …. After almost 3 hours of speeches, the people got restless and started shouting: “March!”…and so we did. I marched with the CodePink contingent. We walked from the Washington Monument, going north on 17rh Street, singing and dancing. We had excellent cheerleaders in our group so the momento was high at all moments. Those reading the entire posting can develop a sense of how CODE PINK was located among the other peace organizations. And, discussion board participants further illustrate the value of agency. In response to this posting, several other women shared their March 15th actions, which occurred in other locations. Moreover, action is tied directly to efficacy. An email newsletter was sent out in the middle of April to denounce retired U.S. General Jay Garner’s role in the rebuilding of Iraq. A few days later, the first paragraph on CODE PINK’s home page stated: “Your involvement is fabulous and effective! Within hours of our last email to you, thousands had responded to the call to stop Jay Garner. Your voices were also felt by Dr. Phil, they had never received so many complaints on a show.” The placement of this statement as the first item of business on the home page indicates the organization’s desire to motivate its members. This need was especially important at a time when the war in Iraq was deemed “successful” by the news and the Bush Administration. This emphasis on the success of CODE PINK’s actions, then, could be seen as a way to keep the organization viable. The Jay Garner protest reflects attempts to publicize the group’s standpoint on the rebuilding of Iraq. Thus, CODE PINK continued to adapt to changing events, connecting new issues with appropriate actions. The web’s speed and interactivity allowed for this flexibility, an ability that has been noted by others (Bonchek, 1995).

Authors: Simone, Maria.
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CODE PINK Alert, 18
minute organization of protests, which was especially evident with the “emergency action alerts” sent to the
list on the eve of the war.
In addition to suggesting actions to take, the various modes of CMC provided information about
the success of actions already taken. For example, the discussion board had several posts regarding the
actions of March 15, 2003, which was a day of planned protests in Washington, D.C. and elsewhere. One
woman provided a lengthy description of the march in Washington, D.C., which I excerpt here:
Thousands of people showed up early morning …. After almost 3 hours of speeches, the people got
restless and started shouting: “March!”…and so we did. I marched with the CodePink contingent.
We walked from the Washington Monument, going north on 17rh Street, singing and dancing. We
had excellent cheerleaders in our group so the momento was high at all moments.
Those reading the entire posting can develop a sense of how CODE PINK was located among the other
peace organizations. And, discussion board participants further illustrate the value of agency. In response to
this posting, several other women shared their March 15th actions, which occurred in other locations.
Moreover, action is tied directly to efficacy. An email newsletter was sent out in the middle of
April to denounce retired U.S. General Jay Garner’s role in the rebuilding of Iraq. A few days later, the first
paragraph on CODE PINK’s home page stated: “Your involvement is fabulous and effective! Within hours
of our last email to you, thousands had responded to the call to stop Jay Garner. Your voices were also felt
by Dr. Phil, they had never received so many complaints on a show.” The placement of this statement as
the first item of business on the home page indicates the organization’s desire to motivate its members. This
need was especially important at a time when the war in Iraq was deemed “successful” by the news and the
Bush Administration. This emphasis on the success of CODE PINK’s actions, then, could be seen as a way
to keep the organization viable. The Jay Garner protest reflects attempts to publicize the group’s standpoint
on the rebuilding of Iraq. Thus, CODE PINK continued to adapt to changing events, connecting new issues
with appropriate actions. The web’s speed and interactivity allowed for this flexibility, an ability that has
been noted by others (Bonchek, 1995).


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