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Effect of Growing Internet Newspapers on Circulation of Print Newspapers in the U.S.
Unformatted Document Text:  2 from radio-listening, reading, and other activities. 5 In a study of the effect of new technology on existing mass media advertising revenues and consumer spending between 1929-1968, McCombs proposed the hypothesis of relative constancy. He found that media spending by consumers roughly parallel the growth of consumers’ income. Consumer spending on mass media was constant over time. 6 The implication of this proposition for traditional media was clear: if new mass communication technology survived and thrived, it would be at the expense of traditional mass communication media. 7 However, more recent studies about new media technology suggested that the spending on new communication technology did not follow the trend of relative constancy. These studies showed that total consumer spending on mass media during the diffusion of cable television and videocassette recorder increased rather than being relatively constant. 8 Wood also argued that constancy would fail as consumers devoted a greater share of income to buy new media technology. 9 Wood and O’Hare found that new video technology, such as VCR, was established without displacing the older mass media. 10 The results of these studies suggest that new media growth may not be at the expense of older media. As a new media technology, the Internet occurred in early 1970s, and is becoming a mass medium with unprecedented speed. 11 The new medium is not simply “a linear extension of the old.” 12 Compared to print newspapers, the Internet newspapers clearly enjoy some advantages. For example, this medium can deliver the news immediately; Internet sites can be updated whenever a reporter discovers more information. 13 The rapid growth of the Internet even changed the ritual of reading a daily newspaper. Once

Authors: Cao, Zhanwei. and Li, Xigen.
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background image
2
from radio-listening, reading, and other activities.
5
In a study of the effect of new technology on existing mass media advertising
revenues and consumer spending between 1929-1968, McCombs proposed the hypothesis
of relative constancy. He found that media spending by consumers roughly parallel the
growth of consumers’ income. Consumer spending on mass media was constant over
time.
6
The implication of this proposition for traditional media was clear: if new mass
communication technology survived and thrived, it would be at the expense of traditional
mass communication media.
7
However, more recent studies about new media technology suggested that the
spending on new communication technology did not follow the trend of relative
constancy. These studies showed that total consumer spending on mass media during the
diffusion of cable television and videocassette recorder increased rather than being
relatively constant.
8
Wood also argued that constancy would fail as consumers devoted a
greater share of income to buy new media technology.
9
Wood and O’Hare found that new
video technology, such as VCR, was established without displacing the older mass
media.
10
The results of these studies suggest that new media growth may not be at the
expense of older media.
As a new media technology, the Internet occurred in early 1970s, and is becoming
a mass medium with unprecedented speed.
11
The new medium is not simply “a linear
extension of the old.”
12
Compared to print newspapers, the Internet newspapers clearly
enjoy some advantages. For example, this medium can deliver the news immediately;
Internet sites can be updated whenever a reporter discovers more information.
13
The rapid
growth of the Internet even changed the ritual of reading a daily newspaper. Once


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