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Season's gone by: Weather and Climate change perceptions in Canada and the US

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Abstract:

It is widely recognized that public opinion is an important factor in shaping societal responses to climate change. In this context, a large and growing literature explores public attitudes toward this complex policy problem. However, research to date has largely focused on public attitudes in the United States, and to a lesser extent, in the United Kingdom. Contributing to this research, this paper is one of the first to explore individual level differences in public attitudes toward climate change with a focus on Canada. As a northern nation, temperatures in Canada have risen at a particularly rapid rate, with very uneven consequences for different parts of the country. As a highly decentralized federation, climate policy in Canada is also differentiated across provincial jurisdictions. As a leading producer of fossil energy, Canada is at the forefront of debates between those who benefit from the status quo and those who believe that the world must hasten its transition toward greener energy. In short, the Canadian experience provides an intriguing case to explore individual-level differences in public perceptions of climate change.

Drawing on a series of original surveys administered between 2011 and 2015, this paper examines differences in perceptions of whether global warming is happening, is human caused, and poses an existential threat to life on Earth. It focuses on factors identified in previous research – like ideology, partisanship, climate relevant knowledge and trust in science – to explore whether the correlates of opinion found in other contexts apply to Canada. Findings from this paper will help shed light on the structure of Canadian public opinion on this important topic, while offering a further test of existing hypotheses in a northern context.
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Association:
Name: American Political Science Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.apsanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125998_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Borick, Christopher. and Lachapelle, Erick. "Season's gone by: Weather and Climate change perceptions in Canada and the US" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2016 <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125998_index.html>

APA Citation:

Borick, C. P. and Lachapelle, E. , 2016-08-31 "Season's gone by: Weather and Climate change perceptions in Canada and the US" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125998_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It is widely recognized that public opinion is an important factor in shaping societal responses to climate change. In this context, a large and growing literature explores public attitudes toward this complex policy problem. However, research to date has largely focused on public attitudes in the United States, and to a lesser extent, in the United Kingdom. Contributing to this research, this paper is one of the first to explore individual level differences in public attitudes toward climate change with a focus on Canada. As a northern nation, temperatures in Canada have risen at a particularly rapid rate, with very uneven consequences for different parts of the country. As a highly decentralized federation, climate policy in Canada is also differentiated across provincial jurisdictions. As a leading producer of fossil energy, Canada is at the forefront of debates between those who benefit from the status quo and those who believe that the world must hasten its transition toward greener energy. In short, the Canadian experience provides an intriguing case to explore individual-level differences in public perceptions of climate change.

Drawing on a series of original surveys administered between 2011 and 2015, this paper examines differences in perceptions of whether global warming is happening, is human caused, and poses an existential threat to life on Earth. It focuses on factors identified in previous research – like ideology, partisanship, climate relevant knowledge and trust in science – to explore whether the correlates of opinion found in other contexts apply to Canada. Findings from this paper will help shed light on the structure of Canadian public opinion on this important topic, while offering a further test of existing hypotheses in a northern context.


Similar Titles:
Reducing Social Vulnerability to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events: The Role of Risk Perception in a Social Environmental Context


 
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