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How to Win Friends and Influence the UN: Donor Influence on the UN Bureaucracy

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Abstract:

Are states able to influence the policy decisions of international institutions via their bureaucracies and, if so, under what conditions? Employing two distinct analyses of United Nations Programmes and Funds, this paper suggests an answer in the affirmative; that states are able to influence policy decisions of IOs by leveraging their bureaucracies, and describes a condition under which they are able to accomplish this. The paper demonstrates that major donors to UN agencies are disproportionately represented on the staffs of those agencies, and that this has distinct policy implications. In particular, the more staff that major donors have within the agencies, the more the agency's aid policy reflects those states' bilateral aid preferences. Furthermore, these results are not driven by the most powerful countries in the system, which suggests that this is an avenue of influence open to a considerable number of countries. These results indicate that the preferences of international bureaucrats are less independent than we have previously thought and that they may, indeed, be endogenous to the states that pushed for their hire to begin with. These findings speak to questions in the literature about when and how states are able to wield informal influence within IOs while also suggesting that more countries are able to use informal influence to their advantage than is usually thought.
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Association:
Name: American Political Science Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.apsanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1127556_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Thorvaldsdottir, Svanhildur. "How to Win Friends and Influence the UN: Donor Influence on the UN Bureaucracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1127556_index.html>

APA Citation:

Thorvaldsdottir, S. "How to Win Friends and Influence the UN: Donor Influence on the UN Bureaucracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1127556_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Are states able to influence the policy decisions of international institutions via their bureaucracies and, if so, under what conditions? Employing two distinct analyses of United Nations Programmes and Funds, this paper suggests an answer in the affirmative; that states are able to influence policy decisions of IOs by leveraging their bureaucracies, and describes a condition under which they are able to accomplish this. The paper demonstrates that major donors to UN agencies are disproportionately represented on the staffs of those agencies, and that this has distinct policy implications. In particular, the more staff that major donors have within the agencies, the more the agency's aid policy reflects those states' bilateral aid preferences. Furthermore, these results are not driven by the most powerful countries in the system, which suggests that this is an avenue of influence open to a considerable number of countries. These results indicate that the preferences of international bureaucrats are less independent than we have previously thought and that they may, indeed, be endogenous to the states that pushed for their hire to begin with. These findings speak to questions in the literature about when and how states are able to wield informal influence within IOs while also suggesting that more countries are able to use informal influence to their advantage than is usually thought.


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