All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

CSR issue and interactivity in the Web of Korean corporations
Unformatted Document Text:  CSR & Interactivity 9 of both customers and society (Kolter, 1991). Petkus and Woodruff (1992) considered this concept in defining CSR as a company’s devotion to minimizing or eliminating any harmful effects and to maximizing its long-term beneficial influence on society. Mohr (1996) indicated, in spite of some differences between two viewpoints, that most definitions of CSR emphasize that a socially responsible company must have concerns beyond temporary profitability. A recent emphasis on CSR in the field of public relations reflects changes in public’ perceptions toward corporations’ roles in their community. The link between CSR and public relations is found in definitions of public relations (Cutlip & Center, 1971; Cutlip, Center, & Broom, 1985; Wilcox, Ault, & Agee, 1989, 1998). Cultip and Center (1971) defined public relations as “the planned effort to influence opinion through good character and responsible performance, based on mutually satisfactory two-way communication” (p. 2). Wilcox and others (1989) defined public relations as “the responsibility of management to serve the public interest” (p. 4) and emphasized that “public relations personnel can help activate the organization's social conscience” (p.17). Cultip and others (1994) more recently defined public relations as ‘the management function’ that establishes and maintains reciprocally beneficial relationships between an organization and the publics. In this light, L'Etang (1994) noted that CSR is considered as “part of the public relations portfolio and a technique to establish relations with particular groups and to signal messages to other groups in society” (p. 113). Furthermore, Mohr, Webb and Harris (2001) indicated that CSR affect consumers’ buying behaviors. This contradicts the existing common assumption that consumers tend to purchase on the basis of their

Authors: Kang, Hyunmee.
first   previous   Page 9 of 48   next   last



background image
CSR & Interactivity 9
of both customers and society (Kolter, 1991). Petkus and Woodruff (1992) considered
this concept in defining CSR as a company’s devotion to minimizing or eliminating any
harmful effects and to maximizing its long-term beneficial influence on society. Mohr
(1996) indicated, in spite of some differences between two viewpoints, that most
definitions of CSR emphasize that a socially responsible company must have concerns
beyond temporary profitability.
A recent emphasis on CSR in the field of public relations reflects changes in
public’ perceptions toward corporations’ roles in their community. The link between CSR
and public relations is found in definitions of public relations (Cutlip & Center, 1971;
Cutlip, Center, & Broom, 1985; Wilcox, Ault, & Agee, 1989, 1998). Cultip and Center
(1971) defined public relations as “the planned effort to influence opinion through good
character and responsible performance, based on mutually satisfactory two-way
communication” (p. 2). Wilcox and others (1989) defined public relations as “the
responsibility of management to serve the public interest” (p. 4) and emphasized that
“public relations personnel can help activate the organization's social conscience” (p.17).
Cultip and others (1994) more recently defined public relations as ‘the management
function’ that establishes and maintains reciprocally beneficial relationships between an
organization and the publics.
In this light, L'Etang (1994) noted that CSR is considered as “part of the public
relations portfolio and a technique to establish relations with particular groups and to
signal messages to other groups in society” (p. 113). Furthermore, Mohr, Webb and
Harris (2001) indicated that CSR affect consumers’ buying behaviors. This contradicts
the existing common assumption that consumers tend to purchase on the basis of their


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 48   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.