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Health Rights, Epidemic Disasters and Political Unrest: The Sickly Trinity

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Abstract:

The burgeoning research on climate change and conflict processes primarily focus on the role of changing weather patterns. In this paper, we focus on an alternative mechanism, the effect of climate change on disease patterns and the intensity of epidemics. Disease outbreak is a specific exogenous shock that creates two alternative conflict processes; outbreak could exacerbate relative deprivation between infected and healthy segments of society, particularly if it falls along socio-economic or ethnic lines, or, the government’s lack of response to an outbreak could stimulate discontent. It is well documented that the sudden insurgence of disease and death of a population leads to increased societal tensions, but the impact of epidemic outbreaks on collective action against the government is understudied. The importance of deciphering linkages between climate change, disease, government response and conflict is highlighted by the eruption of protests in Ebola ridden quarantined slums in West Africa in 2014. We find the frequency of protests is positively related to disease epidemic outbreaks, but the motivation for collective action is linked to perceived government inability to protect and secure the health and wellbeing of its citizens.
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Name: American Political Science Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.apsanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1129034_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Klein, Graig. "Health Rights, Epidemic Disasters and Political Unrest: The Sickly Trinity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1129034_index.html>

APA Citation:

Klein, G. R. , 2016-09-01 "Health Rights, Epidemic Disasters and Political Unrest: The Sickly Trinity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1129034_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The burgeoning research on climate change and conflict processes primarily focus on the role of changing weather patterns. In this paper, we focus on an alternative mechanism, the effect of climate change on disease patterns and the intensity of epidemics. Disease outbreak is a specific exogenous shock that creates two alternative conflict processes; outbreak could exacerbate relative deprivation between infected and healthy segments of society, particularly if it falls along socio-economic or ethnic lines, or, the government’s lack of response to an outbreak could stimulate discontent. It is well documented that the sudden insurgence of disease and death of a population leads to increased societal tensions, but the impact of epidemic outbreaks on collective action against the government is understudied. The importance of deciphering linkages between climate change, disease, government response and conflict is highlighted by the eruption of protests in Ebola ridden quarantined slums in West Africa in 2014. We find the frequency of protests is positively related to disease epidemic outbreaks, but the motivation for collective action is linked to perceived government inability to protect and secure the health and wellbeing of its citizens.


 
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