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Click on Democracy: Will the Internet Bring Democracy to China?
Unformatted Document Text:  38 Solomon, J. (2000). Business as usual. New Scientist, 165, 34-37. State control of the Internet in China. (2002). Amnesty International. Retrieved November 20, 2002, from http://Web.amnesty.org/802568F7005C4453/0/50A38A55EB758C0C80256C72004773CD?Open Street, J. (1999). Remote control? Politics, technology and “electronic democracy.” In H. Mackay & T. O’Sullivan (Eds.), The Media Reader: Continuity and Transformation (pp 385-397). London: Sage Publications Ltd.. Tan, Z., Mueller, M., & Foster, W. (1997). China’s new Internet regulations: Two steps forward, one step back. Communication of the ACM, 40, 11-17. Taubman, G. (1998). A not-so World Wide Web: The Internet, China, and the challenges to nondemocratic rule. Political Communication, 15, 255-272. Tsui, L. (2001). Internet and China: Big mama is watching you. Internet control and the Chinese government. Unpublished Master’s thesis, University of Leiden. Walton, G. (2001). China’s golden shield: Corporations and the development of surveillance technology in the People’s Republic of China. International Center for Human Rights and Democratic Development. Retrieved November 23, 2002 from www.openflows.org Weare, C. (2002). The Internet and democracy: the causal links between technology and politics. International Journal of Public Administration, 25, 659-692. Westen, T. (1998). Can technology save democracy? National Civic Review, 87, 47-57. Wilhelm, A. G. (2000). Democracy in the digital age: Challenges to political life in cyberspace. New York and London: Routledge. Worf, R. (2002). Speaking out. Harvard International Review, Winter, 7-8. Zhang, J. (2002). Will the government “Serve the People?” New Media & Society, 4, 163-184. Zittrain, J., & Edelman, B. (2002). Empirical analysis of Internet filtering in China. Retrieved November 20, 2002 from http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/filtering/china

Authors: Zhang, Ting.
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38
Solomon, J. (2000). Business as usual. New Scientist, 165, 34-37.
State control of the Internet in China. (2002). Amnesty International. Retrieved November 20,
2002, from
http://Web.amnesty.org/802568F7005C4453/0/50A38A55EB758C0C80256C72004773CD?
Open

Street, J. (1999). Remote control? Politics, technology and “electronic democracy.” In H.
Mackay & T. O’Sullivan (Eds.), The Media Reader: Continuity and Transformation (pp 385-
397). London: Sage Publications Ltd..

Tan, Z., Mueller, M., & Foster, W. (1997). China’s new Internet regulations: Two steps forward,
one step back. Communication of the ACM, 40, 11-17.

Taubman, G. (1998). A not-so World Wide Web: The Internet, China, and the challenges to
nondemocratic rule. Political Communication, 15, 255-272.

Tsui, L. (2001). Internet and China: Big mama is watching you. Internet control and the Chinese
government. Unpublished Master’s thesis, University of Leiden.

Walton, G. (2001). China’s golden shield: Corporations and the development of surveillance
technology in the People’s Republic of China. International Center for Human Rights and
Democratic Development.
Retrieved November 23, 2002 from www.openflows.org

Weare, C. (2002). The Internet and democracy: the causal links between technology and politics.
International Journal of Public Administration, 25, 659-692.

Westen, T. (1998). Can technology save democracy? National Civic Review, 87, 47-57.

Wilhelm, A. G. (2000). Democracy in the digital age: Challenges to political life in cyberspace.
New York and London: Routledge.

Worf, R. (2002). Speaking out. Harvard International Review, Winter, 7-8.

Zhang, J. (2002). Will the government “Serve the People?” New Media & Society, 4, 163-184.

Zittrain, J., & Edelman, B. (2002). Empirical analysis of Internet filtering in China. Retrieved
November 20, 2002 from http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/filtering/china


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