All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Soccer in the Media, Public Mood, and how the German ruling coalition won the last national elections
Unformatted Document Text:  Soccer in the Media, Public Mood, and how the German ruling coalition won the last national Elections. The odds seemed against captain “Acker” 1 and his team – the opponent´s team was way in lead and time was running out quickly. At that time, there were few who thought that they could still turn the tide: We still have 10 minutes left to win the match, which means we have to fight, fight and fight, and we cannot analyze the first half. That can be done later.(...) Now it’s time to dive from midfield to the left side, centre the ball, and score. It sounds simple, but that’s the way it is. 2 (Hammerstein & Nelles, 2002, p. 26) In fact, it eventually turned out that “Acker” won after all. “(…) when it looked pretty bad for him, he thought of this name. Then, Gerhard Schroeder had them call him this way, and everything turned out fine “(Blome, 2002). The ruling German chancellor and chairman of the social democratic party had lived up to his reputation as a fighter and campaign-man once again. In his younger years the players of his soccer-team TuS Talle had called their forward player “Acker”, when Bonn and Berlin were still way ahead (Sobolewski, 2002). “They called me ‘Acker’ because I was always really into things, and I admit, I was a little proud indeed to be called by this nickname” (Schröder, 1998). Likewise Schroeder’s opponent, the candidate of the Chrisitian-democratic-Party, Edmund Stoiber, could be proud, too: His team was beaten by the party in power by just a narrow margin. He still missed his first goal though: ‘Now I want to become the manager of the national team, it’s in my interest that Germany moves ahead.’ 3 In the public discourse during the last national election campaign, one does not have to search long for soccer language. And that is not a new phenomenon: Four years earlier the language of the pitch was widely used by journalists and politicians during the campaign, like Zeh and Hagen (1999) have already demonstrated. They also found that success on the pitch can be closely related to victory in the political match. The day the former team manager Berti Vogts resigned from his job as manager of the national soccer team, an all-time low in the daily polls (from Forsa) for the ruling Conservative Party and Chancellor Kohl could be observed. As it turned out, the amount of sports coverage significantly correlated with the voting intention right before the election – even when the politically relevant coverage was controlled for by a multivariate design. The despicable defeat in the World Championships of 1 The Nickname “Acker” could literally be translated from German into “slogger”, meaning someone who fights or toils hard. 2 With this metaphor Franz Müntefering, the general secretary of the German Social Democrats (SPD), was reffering to the fact, that a few weeks befor the national elections the ruling coalition was clearly running behing in the polls. Then it looked very much like SPD and their smaller partner, the Green Party were going to be driven out of office by the opposing Christian Democrats (CDU/CSU) and their partner, the Liberal Party (FDP). 3 Edmund Stoiber speeking to the parliamentary faction oft the CDU, Erfurt February 25 th , 2002. He used the expression “Nationaltrainer” which would normally refer to the manager of the national soccer team.

Authors: Hagen, Lutz., Zeh, Reimar., Reiling, Nina. and Mueller-Klier, Maike.
first   previous   Page 1 of 18   next   last



background image
Soccer in the Media, Public Mood,
and how the German ruling coalition won the last national
Elections.
The odds seemed against captain “Acker”
1
and his team – the opponent´s team was way in
lead and time was running out quickly. At that time, there were few who thought that they
could still turn the tide:

We still have 10 minutes left to win the match, which means we have to fight,
fight and fight, and we cannot analyze the first half. That can be done later.(...)
Now it’s time to dive from midfield to the left side, centre the ball, and score. It
sounds simple, but that’s the way it is.
2
(Hammerstein & Nelles, 2002, p. 26)
In fact, it eventually turned out that “Acker” won after all. “(…) when it looked pretty bad for
him, he thought of this name. Then, Gerhard Schroeder had them call him this way, and
everything turned out fine “(Blome, 2002). The ruling German chancellor and chairman of the
social democratic party had lived up to his reputation as a fighter and campaign-man once
again. In his younger years the players of his soccer-team TuS Talle had called their forward
player “Acker”, when Bonn and Berlin were still way ahead (Sobolewski, 2002). “They called
me ‘Acker’ because I was always really into things, and I admit, I was a little proud indeed to
be called by this nickname” (Schröder, 1998).

Likewise Schroeder’s opponent, the candidate of the Chrisitian-democratic-Party, Edmund
Stoiber, could be proud, too: His team was beaten by the party in power by just a narrow
margin. He still missed his first goal though: ‘Now I want to become the manager of the
national team, it’s in my interest that Germany moves ahead.’
3
In the public discourse during the last national election campaign, one does not have to search
long for soccer language. And that is not a new phenomenon: Four years earlier the language
of the pitch was widely used by journalists and politicians during the campaign, like Zeh and
Hagen (1999) have already demonstrated. They also found that success on the pitch can be
closely related to victory in the political match. The day the former team manager Berti Vogts
resigned from his job as manager of the national soccer team, an all-time low in the daily
polls (from Forsa) for the ruling Conservative Party and Chancellor Kohl could be observed.
As it turned out, the amount of sports coverage significantly correlated with the voting
intention right before the election – even when the politically relevant coverage was
controlled for by a multivariate design. The despicable defeat in the World Championships of
1
The Nickname “Acker” could literally be translated from German into “slogger”, meaning someone who fights
or toils hard.
2
With this metaphor Franz Müntefering, the general secretary of the German Social Democrats (SPD), was
reffering to the fact, that a few weeks befor the national elections the ruling coalition was clearly running
behing in the polls. Then it looked very much like SPD and their smaller partner, the Green Party were going
to be driven out of office by the opposing Christian Democrats (CDU/CSU) and their partner, the Liberal Party
(FDP).
3
Edmund Stoiber speeking to the parliamentary faction oft the CDU, Erfurt February 25
th
, 2002. He used the
expression “Nationaltrainer” which would normally refer to the manager of the national soccer team.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 1 of 18   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.