All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Faculty hiring and the accepability of online degrees
Unformatted Document Text:  9 (Hiltz, 1997; Carnevale, 2003). Because of the sheer number of students engaging this type of educational venue, the importance of the debate about online courses cannot be understated. The perceived credibility of online universities represents a serious problem for all accredited online degree programs, whether these courses are offered by a traditional or by a virtual institution. Many educators point to recent news articles concerning federal funding scams for online education (Carnevale, 2002a) and web sites that sell fake degrees (Carnevale, 2002b). These popularized news events do not lend any credibility to online degree programs and only add to the general sense of skepticism towards online degrees (Sheeres, 2002). These unfortunate circumstances pose problems for supporters of online education, who may acknowledge that there are some programs that should raise questions about the quality of instruction at those universities. Proponents may reasonably point out that the programs offered from a recognized and accredited university do not share the same problems as unproven institutions with no track record of accreditation and that the benefits of distance learning far outweigh drawbacks. Some researchers point out that distance education is as effective as traditional education in the delivery of content (Russell, 1999) but it appears that the question as to whether these courses are seen as competitive has yet to be decided. Weighing the use of technology by professors in teaching and publication has also become an important topic of discussion in many universities (Hattendorf Westney, 2000). Even with the dynamic growth of technology in education, only 13% of academic institutions had a formal institutional program to recognize and reward the use of information technology as part of the faculty review process (Green, 1999). In the past several years, the number of online journals has grown to accommodate ever-increasing number of conference and journal submissions with the hope of shortening publication approval cycles. Although this service was introduced to meet a market need, faculty publications that appear in online journals may not be as important as traditional publications (Sweeney, 2001). In a recent study, administrative recognition for experience with technology and faculty experience managing an online course was seen to be of

Authors: Adams, Jonathan.
first   previous   Page 9 of 26   next   last



background image
9
(Hiltz, 1997; Carnevale, 2003). Because of the sheer number of students engaging this type of
educational venue, the importance of the debate about online courses cannot be understated.
The perceived credibility of online universities represents a serious problem for all
accredited online degree programs, whether these courses are offered by a traditional or by a
virtual institution. Many educators point to recent news articles concerning federal funding
scams for online education (Carnevale, 2002a) and web sites that sell fake degrees (Carnevale,
2002b). These popularized news events do not lend any credibility to online degree programs
and only add to the general sense of skepticism towards online degrees (Sheeres, 2002).
These unfortunate circumstances pose problems for supporters of online education, who
may acknowledge that there are some programs that should raise questions about the quality of
instruction at those universities. Proponents may reasonably point out that the programs offered
from a recognized and accredited university do not share the same problems as unproven
institutions with no track record of accreditation and that the benefits of distance learning far
outweigh drawbacks. Some researchers point out that distance education is as effective as
traditional education in the delivery of content (Russell, 1999) but it appears that the question as
to whether these courses are seen as competitive has yet to be decided.
Weighing the use of technology by professors in teaching and publication has also
become an important topic of discussion in many universities
(Hattendorf Westney, 2000). Even
with the dynamic growth of technology in education, only 13% of academic institutions had a
formal institutional program to recognize and reward the use of information technology as part of
the faculty review process (Green, 1999). In the past several years, the number of online journals
has grown to accommodate ever-increasing number of conference and journal submissions with
the hope of shortening publication approval cycles. Although this service was introduced to meet
a market need, faculty publications that appear in online journals may not be as important as
traditional publications (Sweeney, 2001). In a recent study, administrative recognition for
experience with technology and faculty experience managing an online course was seen to be of


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 26   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.