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Family Communication Patterns, Corporal Punishment and Social Support and their Effects on Relational Violence in Adult Children’s Romantic Relationships
Unformatted Document Text:  Family Comm. &Violence 5 H1a: Relational violence in the form of corporal punishment in the family of origin will be positively correlated with perpetration of relational violence in adult children’s subsequent romantic relationships. H1b: Relational violence in the form of corporal punishment in the family of origin will be positively correlated with victimization of relational violence in adult children’s subsequent romantic relationships. The Moderating Effects of Social Support Social support is primarily conceived of as a functional communication skill, developed within the family unit, utilized as a means of goal achievement (Burleson, Delia, & Applegate, 1995). Levels of social support within a family impact dynamics such as closeness and communication and influence the effects of parent-child interactions (Simons, Lin, & Gordon, 1998). In the current study, social support is defined as an individual’s perception of the support available to the individual in a relationship. In regard to communication, interpersonal relationships that are characterized by open communication, that is, in which individuals feel free to express their own and listen to other’s concerns about relational problems are perceived as providing social support to the individuals involved (Carey & Mongeau, 1996). In families, the presence or absence of social support has been linked to socialization outcomes in children. Simons, Lin, and Gordon (1998), in their research on dating violence, examined the impact of supportive/involved parenting practices associated with social support, such as open communication, warmth, inductive reasoning about rules, monitoring, and consistent discipline on child outcomes. They found that it is the absence of these qualities in parent-child relationships that increases the probability of negative

Authors: Koerner, Ascan. and Maki, Laura.
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Family Comm. &Violence 5
H1a: Relational violence in the form of corporal punishment in the family of origin
will be positively correlated with perpetration of relational violence in adult
children’s subsequent romantic relationships.
H1b: Relational violence in the form of corporal punishment in the family of origin
will be positively correlated with victimization of relational violence in adult
children’s subsequent romantic relationships.
The Moderating Effects of Social Support
Social support is primarily conceived of as a functional communication skill,
developed within the family unit, utilized as a means of goal achievement (Burleson,
Delia, & Applegate, 1995). Levels of social support within a family impact dynamics
such as closeness and communication and influence the effects of parent-child
interactions (Simons, Lin, & Gordon, 1998). In the current study, social support is
defined as an individual’s perception of the support available to the individual in a
relationship. In regard to communication, interpersonal relationships that are
characterized by open communication, that is, in which individuals feel free to express
their own and listen to other’s concerns about relational problems are perceived as
providing social support to the individuals involved (Carey & Mongeau, 1996).
In families, the presence or absence of social support has been linked to socialization
outcomes in children. Simons, Lin, and Gordon (1998), in their research on dating
violence, examined the impact of supportive/involved parenting practices associated with
social support, such as open communication, warmth, inductive reasoning about rules,
monitoring, and consistent discipline on child outcomes. They found that it is the absence
of these qualities in parent-child relationships that increases the probability of negative


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