Citation

Greening the Book Industry – or Greenwashing the Book Industry?

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Abstract:

Greening the book industry is a large-scale task. This paper considers different perspectives on green publishing, using Germany and the German book industry – one of the largest and most productive book industries in the world, and a pioneer in the area of eco-friendly printing and publishing – as a case study. Building upon the historical background discussed in the first two papers of this panel, our paper gives a brief theoretical overview on the media and the history of the environmental movement. It then discusses developments such as the German initiative “Nachhaltig Publizieren” (“Green Publishing”), which is (very roughly) comparable to the US “Green Press Initiative”. Founded in 2011 by the publisher Oekom, the project was originally conceived of as a catalyst for the green publishing movement in Germany. Yet it seems to have lost momentum and arguably has failed to raise the awareness needed to establish green(er) publishing practices in an industry that is struggling. How can standards for green(er) publishing be established – how can greenwashing be avoided or recognized? Which publishers – for which content – truly fulfill green publishing standards? Can they be implemented industry-wide or will the phenomenon remain in a certain niche, associated with green content (environmental fiction, children’s books about nature, alternative travel guides, etc.)? What role do the consumers (readers) play in this process?
It remains to be seen whether supply or demand will be the driving force in the greening of a traditionally conservative cultural industry. This paper discusses these questions on the basis of historical sources from trade magazines and contemporary international trade events such as Frankfurt Book Fair and Drupa Print Media Fair and presents new findings from a survey among German publishers and readers.
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Association:
Name: ASEH Annual Conference
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http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1169615_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Norrick-Rühl, Corinna. and Vogel, Anke. "Greening the Book Industry – or Greenwashing the Book Industry?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1169615_index.html>

APA Citation:

Norrick-Rühl, C. and Vogel, A. "Greening the Book Industry – or Greenwashing the Book Industry?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1169615_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Greening the book industry is a large-scale task. This paper considers different perspectives on green publishing, using Germany and the German book industry – one of the largest and most productive book industries in the world, and a pioneer in the area of eco-friendly printing and publishing – as a case study. Building upon the historical background discussed in the first two papers of this panel, our paper gives a brief theoretical overview on the media and the history of the environmental movement. It then discusses developments such as the German initiative “Nachhaltig Publizieren” (“Green Publishing”), which is (very roughly) comparable to the US “Green Press Initiative”. Founded in 2011 by the publisher Oekom, the project was originally conceived of as a catalyst for the green publishing movement in Germany. Yet it seems to have lost momentum and arguably has failed to raise the awareness needed to establish green(er) publishing practices in an industry that is struggling. How can standards for green(er) publishing be established – how can greenwashing be avoided or recognized? Which publishers – for which content – truly fulfill green publishing standards? Can they be implemented industry-wide or will the phenomenon remain in a certain niche, associated with green content (environmental fiction, children’s books about nature, alternative travel guides, etc.)? What role do the consumers (readers) play in this process?
It remains to be seen whether supply or demand will be the driving force in the greening of a traditionally conservative cultural industry. This paper discusses these questions on the basis of historical sources from trade magazines and contemporary international trade events such as Frankfurt Book Fair and Drupa Print Media Fair and presents new findings from a survey among German publishers and readers.


 
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