Citation

"On the Teeth of the Wind": Atmospheric Knowledge and American Expansion in the Southeastern Borderlands

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The direction, consistency, and temperature of the winds was central to nineteenth-century understandings of health and disease. A kaleidoscopic array of winds—north, east, west, and south, but also trade winds, tropical winds, and sea breezes—swirled across the region and relentlessly engaged the body. As part of the loosely connected practices of medical geography and meteorology, physicians and other residents recorded meteorological data to make arguments about the quality of a place and its people. In the Gulf South, the drive to eradicate expressions of non-white autonomy in the region and repopulate it with white citizens framed the impulse to make sense of these phenomena. At the same time, as a public health measure, knowledge of the winds circulated globally with the rise of cholera, which physicians understood as deeply atmospheric illness.
 
Framed along the question of geographic imaginaries in and of the U.S. Gulf South, this paper explores the meanings ascribed to winds and their characteristics in understandings of health and disease. Studies of the winds permeate accounts of epidemics, and information on winds circulated in a mélange of special interest journals and popular publications.  Physicians and residents used this knowledge to both differentiate their region (e.g. in the quality or quantity of electricity in the atmosphere, the precise character of its winds) and connect it to global currents in the world. Scientific and medical knowledge thus became a social and political tool for reimagining both the region and the bodies contained within it. Ultimately, I illustrate that these currents implicated residents in an intensely local experience of illness that was at the same time yoked to broader patterns of health and disease.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASEH Annual Conference
URL:
http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170255_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

LaFay, Elaine. ""On the Teeth of the Wind": Atmospheric Knowledge and American Expansion in the Southeastern Borderlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170255_index.html>

APA Citation:

LaFay, E. ""On the Teeth of the Wind": Atmospheric Knowledge and American Expansion in the Southeastern Borderlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170255_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The direction, consistency, and temperature of the winds was central to nineteenth-century understandings of health and disease. A kaleidoscopic array of winds—north, east, west, and south, but also trade winds, tropical winds, and sea breezes—swirled across the region and relentlessly engaged the body. As part of the loosely connected practices of medical geography and meteorology, physicians and other residents recorded meteorological data to make arguments about the quality of a place and its people. In the Gulf South, the drive to eradicate expressions of non-white autonomy in the region and repopulate it with white citizens framed the impulse to make sense of these phenomena. At the same time, as a public health measure, knowledge of the winds circulated globally with the rise of cholera, which physicians understood as deeply atmospheric illness.
 
Framed along the question of geographic imaginaries in and of the U.S. Gulf South, this paper explores the meanings ascribed to winds and their characteristics in understandings of health and disease. Studies of the winds permeate accounts of epidemics, and information on winds circulated in a mélange of special interest journals and popular publications.  Physicians and residents used this knowledge to both differentiate their region (e.g. in the quality or quantity of electricity in the atmosphere, the precise character of its winds) and connect it to global currents in the world. Scientific and medical knowledge thus became a social and political tool for reimagining both the region and the bodies contained within it. Ultimately, I illustrate that these currents implicated residents in an intensely local experience of illness that was at the same time yoked to broader patterns of health and disease.


Similar Titles:
Seeds of Fire – African American Indigenous Knowledge and Skill Development

Intercontinental Borderland: The Second Russian-American Company Colony on Urup in the Performance of Russo-Japanese Relations

African American and Mexican American Poverty in the Lower Mississippi Delta and the Texas Borderland

Government Strategy and Metis Tactic: Nationalising the Canadian-American Borderlands.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.