Citation

A Patchwork Homogeneity: Industrial Cotton in Interwar New Mexico

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Abstract:

Between the world wars, the global empire of industrial cotton spread into newly irrigated lands of southern New Mexico and far west Texas and reshaped the local environmental and cultural landscape. Cotton’s arrival spurred new migrations among farmers and farmworkers, led to new and stronger regional alliances among growers, and strengthened ties between the land-grant college and growers throughout the borderlands. As cotton instigated migrations of diverse people and genetic material into the region, it paradoxically led to increased homogenization in the fields themselves as farmers organized to plant the same single variety of cotton, often in large mono-cropped fields that left little room for soil-building, rotational crops. Yet this homogenization was neither foreordained nor complete; rather, industrialization followed a contingent, ever-changing, and contested path.

This paper traces this path by examining the interwar cotton-growing methods and seed-breeding efforts of agriculturalists throughout the New Mexico Borderlands. Crop and farm diversity, this paper argues, often underwrote early industrial agricultural projects. The history of New Mexico’s many early cotton farms, themselves ever-evolving composites of diverse growing systems, reveals how one-crop farming during this time often belied early logics of industrialism and often relied, both directly and indirectly, on more diverse farms of all sizes.
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Name: ASEH Annual Conference
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http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170433_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Carleton, William. "A Patchwork Homogeneity: Industrial Cotton in Interwar New Mexico" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170433_index.html>

APA Citation:

Carleton, W. "A Patchwork Homogeneity: Industrial Cotton in Interwar New Mexico" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170433_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Between the world wars, the global empire of industrial cotton spread into newly irrigated lands of southern New Mexico and far west Texas and reshaped the local environmental and cultural landscape. Cotton’s arrival spurred new migrations among farmers and farmworkers, led to new and stronger regional alliances among growers, and strengthened ties between the land-grant college and growers throughout the borderlands. As cotton instigated migrations of diverse people and genetic material into the region, it paradoxically led to increased homogenization in the fields themselves as farmers organized to plant the same single variety of cotton, often in large mono-cropped fields that left little room for soil-building, rotational crops. Yet this homogenization was neither foreordained nor complete; rather, industrialization followed a contingent, ever-changing, and contested path.

This paper traces this path by examining the interwar cotton-growing methods and seed-breeding efforts of agriculturalists throughout the New Mexico Borderlands. Crop and farm diversity, this paper argues, often underwrote early industrial agricultural projects. The history of New Mexico’s many early cotton farms, themselves ever-evolving composites of diverse growing systems, reveals how one-crop farming during this time often belied early logics of industrialism and often relied, both directly and indirectly, on more diverse farms of all sizes.


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