Citation

Eminent Domain, Environmental Politics, and New York’s $1.00 Prison

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Abstract:

My paper explores an eminent domain case from 1977 that grew out of the carceral and economic crises afflicting the U.S. in the late twentieth century. The simultaneous housing needs of the federal Bureau of Prisons—plagued by worsening inmate overcrowding and persistent NIMBYism in its pursuit of expanded cell capacity—and the Lake Placid Olympic Organizing Committee—in desperate need of inexpensive, temporary dormitories for athletes participating in the 1980 Winter Olympic Games—ultimately converged at a long undeveloped, 155-acre tract of New York’s “Forever Wild” Forest Preserve in the Adirondack Park hamlet of Ray Brook. The legal process whereby the Department of Justice seized control of a parcel of forestland protected by the New York Constitution for construction of an Olympic Village slated for future use as a federal medium security penitentiary for juvenile offenders exposed the inability of state regulatory bodies such as the Department of Environmental Conservation and Adirondack Park Agency to control potentially damaging developments on state land; reminded relevant stakeholders of the federal government’s power to circumvent even the strictest of state-level environmental protections in service of an ill-defined notion of the public good; and showed that even in an age of heightened awareness and appreciation for the ties binding ecological and public health, developers’ needs—even for a prison—often outweighed those of affected parties such as local residents, tourists, prisoners and their families, and the nonhuman world as a whole.
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Association:
Name: ASEH Annual Conference
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http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170713_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hall, Clarence. "Eminent Domain, Environmental Politics, and New York’s $1.00 Prison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170713_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hall, C. J. "Eminent Domain, Environmental Politics, and New York’s $1.00 Prison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170713_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: My paper explores an eminent domain case from 1977 that grew out of the carceral and economic crises afflicting the U.S. in the late twentieth century. The simultaneous housing needs of the federal Bureau of Prisons—plagued by worsening inmate overcrowding and persistent NIMBYism in its pursuit of expanded cell capacity—and the Lake Placid Olympic Organizing Committee—in desperate need of inexpensive, temporary dormitories for athletes participating in the 1980 Winter Olympic Games—ultimately converged at a long undeveloped, 155-acre tract of New York’s “Forever Wild” Forest Preserve in the Adirondack Park hamlet of Ray Brook. The legal process whereby the Department of Justice seized control of a parcel of forestland protected by the New York Constitution for construction of an Olympic Village slated for future use as a federal medium security penitentiary for juvenile offenders exposed the inability of state regulatory bodies such as the Department of Environmental Conservation and Adirondack Park Agency to control potentially damaging developments on state land; reminded relevant stakeholders of the federal government’s power to circumvent even the strictest of state-level environmental protections in service of an ill-defined notion of the public good; and showed that even in an age of heightened awareness and appreciation for the ties binding ecological and public health, developers’ needs—even for a prison—often outweighed those of affected parties such as local residents, tourists, prisoners and their families, and the nonhuman world as a whole.


 
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