Citation

Call of the Domestic: Huskies, Prospectors, and Inupiat in the Nome Gold Rush

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Abstract:

This paper examines how the Nome Gold Rush transformed the relationship between dogs and people on Alaska’s Seward Peninsula, from 1898 through the early years of the twentieth century. Sled dogs made the Alaskan bush accessible to humans, particularly in the winter, and had been used by the Inupiat people for centuries as hunting and pack animals. These dogs were generally large, slow, and strong. In the early boom years of the gold rush, prospectors introduced a demand for dogs able to transport people and freight over long distances. While miners brought canine breeds from the south, they quickly recognized that Inupiat animals carried better adaptations to the cold, from their paws to their thick coats. Dogs became a point of sustained contact between two communities that tended to work, live, and eat separately. This paper examines how dog mushing became a hybrid pursuit, blending knowledge and values from both Inupiat and miners. This was not without conflict, often the result of dogs fighting, breeding, eating, or running in ways that contradicted human plans. But overall, the result was a vibrant, unruly joint community of people who raised, trained, sold, raced, and worked with dogs. It also made hybrid animals, as dogs and mushers began creating smaller, faster animals from a mix of local stock and imported breeds. The paper looks at how we can think of animals as central points of social contact, as active, agented, living site of joined cultural and genetic creation.
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Name: ASEH Annual Conference
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http://aseh.net


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170787_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Demuth, Bathsheba. "Call of the Domestic: Huskies, Prospectors, and Inupiat in the Nome Gold Rush" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170787_index.html>

APA Citation:

Demuth, B. "Call of the Domestic: Huskies, Prospectors, and Inupiat in the Nome Gold Rush" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170787_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper examines how the Nome Gold Rush transformed the relationship between dogs and people on Alaska’s Seward Peninsula, from 1898 through the early years of the twentieth century. Sled dogs made the Alaskan bush accessible to humans, particularly in the winter, and had been used by the Inupiat people for centuries as hunting and pack animals. These dogs were generally large, slow, and strong. In the early boom years of the gold rush, prospectors introduced a demand for dogs able to transport people and freight over long distances. While miners brought canine breeds from the south, they quickly recognized that Inupiat animals carried better adaptations to the cold, from their paws to their thick coats. Dogs became a point of sustained contact between two communities that tended to work, live, and eat separately. This paper examines how dog mushing became a hybrid pursuit, blending knowledge and values from both Inupiat and miners. This was not without conflict, often the result of dogs fighting, breeding, eating, or running in ways that contradicted human plans. But overall, the result was a vibrant, unruly joint community of people who raised, trained, sold, raced, and worked with dogs. It also made hybrid animals, as dogs and mushers began creating smaller, faster animals from a mix of local stock and imported breeds. The paper looks at how we can think of animals as central points of social contact, as active, agented, living site of joined cultural and genetic creation.


 
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