Citation

Germany’s ‘Wooden Walls’: Timber as a Strategic Raw Material during the First World War

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Wood laid the foundations of Germany’s war economy in the First World War, often quite literally, and the circulation of wood across German-occupied Central Europe remained vital down to the end of the war. This paper will examine the movement of this critical material between the occupied territories, the front, and the home front, and assess the economic, military, and ecological significance of these flows.

While we often think of the front during the First World War as defined by the “storm of steel,” wood played almost as important a role in the trenches. Given the defensive nature of the combat and the sogginess of the terrain, armies requisitioned huge quantities of timber in the trenches. Weapons also consumed vast amount of lumber, from rifle stocks to aircraft (built primarily out of wood). Timber also played a critical role in maintaining the home front, from the pit props used in mines, the railway ties and telegraph poles essential for transportation and communications networks, and the wood pulp necessary for newspapers (so critical for maintaining morale).

With imports severely restricted and labor in short supply, timber gradually became a scarce commodity. While forests nearest the fronts were damaged by warfare, heavy cutting soon followed, denuding portions of northern France and Belgium. By 1916, the newly-occupied territories of the western Russian Empire became an important source of lumber, with wood shipped directly from Eastern Europe to the Western Front to shore up German positions. As a consequence, Russian Poland in particular saw disastrous deforestation.
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASEH Annual Conference
URL:
http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170986_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Wilson, Jeffrey. "Germany’s ‘Wooden Walls’: Timber as a Strategic Raw Material during the First World War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170986_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wilson, J. K. "Germany’s ‘Wooden Walls’: Timber as a Strategic Raw Material during the First World War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170986_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Wood laid the foundations of Germany’s war economy in the First World War, often quite literally, and the circulation of wood across German-occupied Central Europe remained vital down to the end of the war. This paper will examine the movement of this critical material between the occupied territories, the front, and the home front, and assess the economic, military, and ecological significance of these flows.

While we often think of the front during the First World War as defined by the “storm of steel,” wood played almost as important a role in the trenches. Given the defensive nature of the combat and the sogginess of the terrain, armies requisitioned huge quantities of timber in the trenches. Weapons also consumed vast amount of lumber, from rifle stocks to aircraft (built primarily out of wood). Timber also played a critical role in maintaining the home front, from the pit props used in mines, the railway ties and telegraph poles essential for transportation and communications networks, and the wood pulp necessary for newspapers (so critical for maintaining morale).

With imports severely restricted and labor in short supply, timber gradually became a scarce commodity. While forests nearest the fronts were damaged by warfare, heavy cutting soon followed, denuding portions of northern France and Belgium. By 1916, the newly-occupied territories of the western Russian Empire became an important source of lumber, with wood shipped directly from Eastern Europe to the Western Front to shore up German positions. As a consequence, Russian Poland in particular saw disastrous deforestation.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.