Citation

Global Trading Giant or “Have-Not” Country? Natural and National Resource Anxieties in 1930s Japan

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

My paper explores a contradictory chapter in Japanese environmental and economic history: how zero-sum views of global endowments in natural resources dominated Japanese policy discourse by the mid-1930s, even though Japanese exporters were enjoying unprecedented success.

The 1930s Japanese economy relied tremendously on international trade in natural resources. Heavy industrial and armaments manufacturing required prodigious quantities of petroleum, iron ore, and other materials largely unavailable within the Japanese Empire. Textiles, Japan’s leading export sector, depended almost entirely on imported raw cotton. In a Depression-era world where financial markets dried up as a means to pay for trade deficits, the Japanese economy purchased these raw materials with exports of cotton cloth, silk, light machinery, gewgaws, pottery, and canned seafood. These exports also featured centrally in Japan’s recovery from the Great Depression. At a time when world trade spiraled downward, a swelling wave of exports, especially cotton and rayon fabrics, lifted the Japanese economy out of depression after 1931. Besides Sweden, Japan was the only country in the world where exports rose more rapidly than industrial production in the 1930s.

One might think that such success in trade would vindicate the “small Japanism” of the liberal publicist Ishibashi Tanzan, who famously envisioned Japan as a global trading giant and opposed maintaining an expensive overseas empire. Instead, emotional reactions to the Great Depression, political fallout from the 1931 Manchurian invasion, and rancorous friction with the United Kingdom over textile markets encouraged a zero-sum view of the world’s resources and territory. Established powers like Britain were cast as greedy guardians of the international status quo denying overcrowded, “have-not” Japan a seat at the table of established industrial nations. Tragically, influential public opinion leaders perceived an emerging world order of cutthroat, Darwinian economic nationalism and demanded that Japan seize political control over natural resources.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASEH Annual Conference
URL:
http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170987_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Dinmore, Eric. "Global Trading Giant or “Have-Not” Country? Natural and National Resource Anxieties in 1930s Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170987_index.html>

APA Citation:

Dinmore, E. "Global Trading Giant or “Have-Not” Country? Natural and National Resource Anxieties in 1930s Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170987_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: My paper explores a contradictory chapter in Japanese environmental and economic history: how zero-sum views of global endowments in natural resources dominated Japanese policy discourse by the mid-1930s, even though Japanese exporters were enjoying unprecedented success.

The 1930s Japanese economy relied tremendously on international trade in natural resources. Heavy industrial and armaments manufacturing required prodigious quantities of petroleum, iron ore, and other materials largely unavailable within the Japanese Empire. Textiles, Japan’s leading export sector, depended almost entirely on imported raw cotton. In a Depression-era world where financial markets dried up as a means to pay for trade deficits, the Japanese economy purchased these raw materials with exports of cotton cloth, silk, light machinery, gewgaws, pottery, and canned seafood. These exports also featured centrally in Japan’s recovery from the Great Depression. At a time when world trade spiraled downward, a swelling wave of exports, especially cotton and rayon fabrics, lifted the Japanese economy out of depression after 1931. Besides Sweden, Japan was the only country in the world where exports rose more rapidly than industrial production in the 1930s.

One might think that such success in trade would vindicate the “small Japanism” of the liberal publicist Ishibashi Tanzan, who famously envisioned Japan as a global trading giant and opposed maintaining an expensive overseas empire. Instead, emotional reactions to the Great Depression, political fallout from the 1931 Manchurian invasion, and rancorous friction with the United Kingdom over textile markets encouraged a zero-sum view of the world’s resources and territory. Established powers like Britain were cast as greedy guardians of the international status quo denying overcrowded, “have-not” Japan a seat at the table of established industrial nations. Tragically, influential public opinion leaders perceived an emerging world order of cutthroat, Darwinian economic nationalism and demanded that Japan seize political control over natural resources.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.