Citation

Building New Networks of Power: Changing Environmental Relations along the Kiso River in Interwar Japan

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In this paper I build on Thomas Hughes’ 1983 Networks of Power to argue for what I call an “environmental relations” approach to understanding how complex webs of human interaction with their environments change over time. Where Hughes focused broadly on the building of electricity networks as “technological systems” in the United States and Europe during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, I examine the controversy surrounding the siting and building of the Oi Dam on the Kiso River in interwar Japan. I argue that this particular conflict was representative of how local and regional webs of environmental relations throughout interwar Japan fundamentally changed through their integration into national and transnational flows of technology, money, and political power.
Completed in 1924, the Oi Dam became Japan’s first straight-gravity concrete dam with its own electric power plant and accompanied the consolidation of the country’s electric power industry into just five regional companies (from as many as six-hundred two decades earlier). Built on one of Japan’s largest rivers where it flows swiftly from the Japanese Alps onto the expansive Nobi Plain, the Oi Dam became a site of conflict between rural farming and logging communities and the urban and industrial interests of Nagoya, then Japan’s third largest city. From at least the seventeenth century, the Kiso had played an essential role in the environmental relations that included transporting logs from upstream villages to cities like Nagoya and in supplying water to extensive irrigation networks that fed and drained the region’s rice paddies. Built with new concrete and turbine technologies, advice from American engineers, and capital raised in Tokyo’s financial markets, the Oi Dam fundamentally disrupted these existing environmental relations but it did not destroy them.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASEH Annual Conference
URL:
http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171135_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Wilson, Roderick. "Building New Networks of Power: Changing Environmental Relations along the Kiso River in Interwar Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171135_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wilson, R. "Building New Networks of Power: Changing Environmental Relations along the Kiso River in Interwar Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171135_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In this paper I build on Thomas Hughes’ 1983 Networks of Power to argue for what I call an “environmental relations” approach to understanding how complex webs of human interaction with their environments change over time. Where Hughes focused broadly on the building of electricity networks as “technological systems” in the United States and Europe during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, I examine the controversy surrounding the siting and building of the Oi Dam on the Kiso River in interwar Japan. I argue that this particular conflict was representative of how local and regional webs of environmental relations throughout interwar Japan fundamentally changed through their integration into national and transnational flows of technology, money, and political power.
Completed in 1924, the Oi Dam became Japan’s first straight-gravity concrete dam with its own electric power plant and accompanied the consolidation of the country’s electric power industry into just five regional companies (from as many as six-hundred two decades earlier). Built on one of Japan’s largest rivers where it flows swiftly from the Japanese Alps onto the expansive Nobi Plain, the Oi Dam became a site of conflict between rural farming and logging communities and the urban and industrial interests of Nagoya, then Japan’s third largest city. From at least the seventeenth century, the Kiso had played an essential role in the environmental relations that included transporting logs from upstream villages to cities like Nagoya and in supplying water to extensive irrigation networks that fed and drained the region’s rice paddies. Built with new concrete and turbine technologies, advice from American engineers, and capital raised in Tokyo’s financial markets, the Oi Dam fundamentally disrupted these existing environmental relations but it did not destroy them.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.