Citation

Constructing Wetlands

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In order to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, developers had to avoid environmental impact, minimize it, or “rectify the impact by repairing, rehabilitating, or restoring the affected environment.” The subsequent Clean Water Act and Endangered Species Act reinforced the mandate to “minimize and mitigate.” Environmental historians have shown how species preservation efforts arose from the requirement to “minimize” environmental impact. But mitigation also had profound consequences for American environments, although it is the less-studied option. After centuries of viewing wetlands as undesirable, Americans had come to see them as valuable both for people and for other species; for the first time, restoration was required by law. Beginning in the 1970s, ecologists, federal agencies, and environmental NGOs such as The Nature Conservancy debated which materials should determine the boundaries of wetlands: water, hydric soil, or plants adapted to saturation. Simultaneously, they worked to restore these materials to landscapes. But each one presented challenges, and a debate rapidly opened over what counted as “successful” restoration. As the material environment shaped scientific understanding, scientific understanding shaped the material environment, including the retention pond behind Walmart, the $7.8 billion Florida Everglades Restoration Plan, and thousands of other wetlands constructed across the United States.
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASEH Annual Conference
URL:
http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171213_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Martin, Laura. "Constructing Wetlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171213_index.html>

APA Citation:

Martin, L. J. "Constructing Wetlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171213_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In order to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, developers had to avoid environmental impact, minimize it, or “rectify the impact by repairing, rehabilitating, or restoring the affected environment.” The subsequent Clean Water Act and Endangered Species Act reinforced the mandate to “minimize and mitigate.” Environmental historians have shown how species preservation efforts arose from the requirement to “minimize” environmental impact. But mitigation also had profound consequences for American environments, although it is the less-studied option. After centuries of viewing wetlands as undesirable, Americans had come to see them as valuable both for people and for other species; for the first time, restoration was required by law. Beginning in the 1970s, ecologists, federal agencies, and environmental NGOs such as The Nature Conservancy debated which materials should determine the boundaries of wetlands: water, hydric soil, or plants adapted to saturation. Simultaneously, they worked to restore these materials to landscapes. But each one presented challenges, and a debate rapidly opened over what counted as “successful” restoration. As the material environment shaped scientific understanding, scientific understanding shaped the material environment, including the retention pond behind Walmart, the $7.8 billion Florida Everglades Restoration Plan, and thousands of other wetlands constructed across the United States.


Similar Titles:
Sizing effectiveness of constructed wetlands for retaining tile-drain runoff and reducing nutrient inputs in watersheds.

Object based vegetation classification with unmanned aerial system to assess the productivity of a constructed wetland

From Urban Cesspool to Nature’s Kidneys? Constructed Wetlands and the Chemicalization of Urban Ecology in Southeast San Francisco

State Sovereignty vs. the Ocean: Administrative Practice and the Construction of Wetlands


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.