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Agroindustrialization and the Green Revolution: The Rise of the Brazilian Sugar and Alcohol Complex in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, 1960-1990

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Abstract:

Today, Brazil is one of the leading producers of sugar and ethanol (known as alcohol in Brazil) in the world. The sugar sector had been a much-maligned industry, dependent on state support for survival through much of the early 20th century. However, in the 1960s, the industry became an increasingly major part of the country’s economic growth model under the military dictatorship (1964-1985). Behind extensive government financed modernization programs, the agro-industrial complex was born. This transformation gave large-scale private sugar producers particular import within the military dictatorship’s development agenda, which they used to help push the state’s intervention in the private expansion of a national ethanol initiative (the National Alcohol Program, Proálcool) in the 1975, following the first OPEC-induced oil shock of 1973 with dramatic environmental implications.
This paper explores the unique agro-industrial development of the Brazilian sugar sector in the 1960s, defining an important type of export-driven agricultural growth and birthing a large-scale domestic alternative energy industry, or sugar-based ethanol, along the way. Through a close analysis of the rise of the agro-industrial complex in the 1960s, this paper contextualizes the ethanol program’s development in the 1970s beyond the traditional analysis of the oil shocks of 1973 and instead drawing attention to its place in the broader technology-focused enthusiasm of the Green Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. Using the largest sugar and alcohol producing region as a representation of this technological transformation, this paper thus draws new attention to the Green Revolution in Brazilian development debates of the 20th century with important implications on strategies for the 21st century.
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Name: ASEH Annual Conference
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http://aseh.net


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171244_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Eaglin, Jennifer. "Agroindustrialization and the Green Revolution: The Rise of the Brazilian Sugar and Alcohol Complex in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, 1960-1990" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171244_index.html>

APA Citation:

Eaglin, J. "Agroindustrialization and the Green Revolution: The Rise of the Brazilian Sugar and Alcohol Complex in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, 1960-1990" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171244_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Today, Brazil is one of the leading producers of sugar and ethanol (known as alcohol in Brazil) in the world. The sugar sector had been a much-maligned industry, dependent on state support for survival through much of the early 20th century. However, in the 1960s, the industry became an increasingly major part of the country’s economic growth model under the military dictatorship (1964-1985). Behind extensive government financed modernization programs, the agro-industrial complex was born. This transformation gave large-scale private sugar producers particular import within the military dictatorship’s development agenda, which they used to help push the state’s intervention in the private expansion of a national ethanol initiative (the National Alcohol Program, Proálcool) in the 1975, following the first OPEC-induced oil shock of 1973 with dramatic environmental implications.
This paper explores the unique agro-industrial development of the Brazilian sugar sector in the 1960s, defining an important type of export-driven agricultural growth and birthing a large-scale domestic alternative energy industry, or sugar-based ethanol, along the way. Through a close analysis of the rise of the agro-industrial complex in the 1960s, this paper contextualizes the ethanol program’s development in the 1970s beyond the traditional analysis of the oil shocks of 1973 and instead drawing attention to its place in the broader technology-focused enthusiasm of the Green Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. Using the largest sugar and alcohol producing region as a representation of this technological transformation, this paper thus draws new attention to the Green Revolution in Brazilian development debates of the 20th century with important implications on strategies for the 21st century.


 
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