Citation

Empire, Trees, and Climate: Critical Dendroprovenancing in the British North Atlantic

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

How can historical geographers and environmental historians collaborate with geophysical scientists to understand Britain’s global empire and forest and climate histories of the North Atlantic? The following paper is based on an international collaborative project, “Empire, Trees, and Climate: Critical Dendroprovenancing in the British North Atlantic,” which combines theoretical and methodological approaches in historical geography and history with dendrochronology to understand how the Atlantic triangle trade in timber can inform studies on climate. In the early to mid-nineteenth century, British North America was an integral site in Britain’s triangular trade of timber, fish, sugar, rum, and molasses with the West Indies. Known today as eastern Canada, the region’s forests and watersheds were transformed into the “modern” world system as the Crown secured lands and timber rights during the Napoleonic Wars. Considering that British North American timber was integral to ship-building, imperial infrastructure (dockyards, fortifications, government buildings), and maritime supremacy in the age of sail, we provide an overview of our findings on how archival and museum research, dendroprovenancing (e.g. analysis of tree ring widths of historic buildings and shipwrecks), and visualizing techniques using GIS can provide important insights into climatic conditions of the past. We also discuss the benefits and challenges of bringing together geography and history, and more specifically approaches from the humanities and environmental sciences. This project is funded by the Government of Canada’s SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2014-2016).
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASEH Annual Conference
URL:
http://aseh.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171338_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Greer, Kirsten. "Empire, Trees, and Climate: Critical Dendroprovenancing in the British North Atlantic" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171338_index.html>

APA Citation:

Greer, K. "Empire, Trees, and Climate: Critical Dendroprovenancing in the British North Atlantic" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2018-01-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1171338_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: How can historical geographers and environmental historians collaborate with geophysical scientists to understand Britain’s global empire and forest and climate histories of the North Atlantic? The following paper is based on an international collaborative project, “Empire, Trees, and Climate: Critical Dendroprovenancing in the British North Atlantic,” which combines theoretical and methodological approaches in historical geography and history with dendrochronology to understand how the Atlantic triangle trade in timber can inform studies on climate. In the early to mid-nineteenth century, British North America was an integral site in Britain’s triangular trade of timber, fish, sugar, rum, and molasses with the West Indies. Known today as eastern Canada, the region’s forests and watersheds were transformed into the “modern” world system as the Crown secured lands and timber rights during the Napoleonic Wars. Considering that British North American timber was integral to ship-building, imperial infrastructure (dockyards, fortifications, government buildings), and maritime supremacy in the age of sail, we provide an overview of our findings on how archival and museum research, dendroprovenancing (e.g. analysis of tree ring widths of historic buildings and shipwrecks), and visualizing techniques using GIS can provide important insights into climatic conditions of the past. We also discuss the benefits and challenges of bringing together geography and history, and more specifically approaches from the humanities and environmental sciences. This project is funded by the Government of Canada’s SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2014-2016).


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.