All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Experiencing Democratic Education: Political Theory and Public Achievement
Unformatted Document Text:  Hildreth 5 graded (self-grade, peer-grade, instructor grade, a combination, etc.), and regularly evaluate the course (at the end of every session and through a mid-year written evaluation). Obviously, the course was not “fully” democratic; I still determined the readings, assignments, and general structure. 3 I tried to open up some decisions and control to the students as a learning opportunity. As a result, the class became both an object of analysis and a collective political project. As such, the class attempted to make explicit the ways in which democracy can (and cannot) function in the classroom, in order to model a mode of democratic practice that students could draw from in their role as coaches. The Practicum The course includes an integrated year-long practicum where students serve as “coaches” in Public Achievement– an experiential civic education program. On Thursdays, undergraduates would travel to a St. Bernard’s, a K-12 Catholic school in St. Paul, Minnesota to work with teams of young people who are designing and carrying out their own political action projects. Public Achievement was developed by the University of Minnesota’s Center for Democracy and Citizenship. It is based on the concept of “public work,” which is defined by Harry Boyte and James Farr as the “expenditure of visible efforts by ordinary citizens whose collective labor produces things or create processes of lasting civic value” (1997, 42). 4 Public work envisions democracy as the “work of the people.” Accordingly, citizenship is viewed in terms of being a co-creator of the public world, in contrast to being a consumer, client, or volunteer (Boyte and Kari 1996). Public Achievement programs currently operate in seven states, and internationally in Northern Ireland, Turkey and Palestine.

Authors: Hildreth, Roudy.
first   previous   Page 6 of 35   next   last



background image
Hildreth
5
graded (self-grade, peer-grade, instructor grade, a combination, etc.), and regularly evaluate the
course (at the end of every session and through a mid-year written evaluation). Obviously, the
course was not “fully” democratic; I still determined the readings, assignments, and general
structure.
3
I tried to open up some decisions and control to the students as a learning
opportunity. As a result, the class became both an object of analysis and a collective political
project. As such, the class attempted to make explicit the ways in which democracy can (and
cannot) function in the classroom, in order to model a mode of democratic practice that students
could draw from in their role as coaches.
The Practicum
The course includes an integrated year-long practicum where students serve as “coaches”
in Public Achievement– an experiential civic education program. On Thursdays, undergraduates
would travel to a St. Bernard’s, a K-12 Catholic school in St. Paul, Minnesota to work with
teams of young people who are designing and carrying out their own political action projects.
Public Achievement was developed by the University of Minnesota’s Center for Democracy and
Citizenship. It is based on the concept of “public work,” which is defined by Harry Boyte and
James Farr as the “expenditure of visible efforts by ordinary citizens whose collective labor
produces things or create processes of lasting civic value” (1997, 42).
4
Public work envisions
democracy as the “work of the people.” Accordingly, citizenship is viewed in terms of being a
co-creator of the public world, in contrast to being a consumer, client, or volunteer (Boyte and
Kari 1996). Public Achievement programs currently operate in seven states, and internationally
in Northern Ireland, Turkey and Palestine.


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.